Presidential Veto Power and Other Powers

Presidential Veto Power and Other Powers - The Presidential...

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Unformatted text preview: The Presidential Veto D. Jason Berggren University of Georgia Spring 2008 Regular Package Veto Power • After receiving bill from Congress: • President can Sign bill in 10 days--becomes law (Sundays excluded) • No presidential signature in 10 days--bill becomes law • but Presidents can “forbid” legislation they disagree with or that they find as “unconstitutional” • mere threat of veto can alter bill to president’s liking • regular package veto : returns full bill with his objections within 10 days to legislative chamber of bill’s origin (thus, also known as a “return veto”) Qualified Veto Power • Congressional Power--2/3’s Override of members present in each chamber • chamber of origin votes to override first then second chamber • if override fails in chamber of origin, bill dies, President’s position wins • if override fails, Congress may reintroduce with new legislation • if override successful in both, Congress’ position wins Qualified Veto Power • As such, president possess a qualified veto , not an absolute veto • Congress does not have to take an override vote (perhaps it lacks votes for override) – if no override vote, bill dies at end of Congress and president’s position wins • Congress may delay override vote (perhaps need time to get needed votes) – though must vote before legislative session ends; otherwise bill dies and president’s position wins Qualified Veto Power • most vetoed bills in history were private bills--bills passed by Congress that affect a particular individual or company • many of these private bills involved federal petition claims of Union soldiers from the Civil War • most serious bills to veto may be appropriations (spending) bills • “A veto of an appropriations bill can result in the closure of federal agencies, the furlough of federal employees, and the interruption of federal programs and services” (Kosar 2007)--government shutdown (happened twice in 1995) • to date, 83 appropriations bills have been vetoed (1789- 2008)--more than half of these since 1968 Pocket Veto Power • pocket veto : do nothing at end of Congress or congressional session, not for brief recesses • conditional absolute veto • pocket vetoed bill must be reintroduced, re-passed, and resubmitted to the President • James Madison was first president to pocket veto a bill (1812) Pocket Veto Power • President Bush pocket vetoed National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (H.R. 1585) on December 28, 2007 • House adjourned until January 15, 2008; Senate in recess until January 22 • President’s objection: bill included language that would permit lawsuits for those seeking damages and restitution from the Saddam Hussein era; this would expose the Iraqi government to great expense • President Bush: this provision in bill “would imperil billions of dollars of Iraqi assets at a crucial juncture in that nation’s reconstruction efforts” Pocket Veto Power...
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course POLIS 1101 taught by Professor Berggren during the Spring '08 term at UGA.

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Presidential Veto Power and Other Powers - The Presidential...

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