Chapter_12_Part_2 - Chapter 12: Solutions Part 2...

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CHM 1220/1225 Chapter 12 Part 2 1 of 4 Chapter 12: Solutions Part 2 Colligative Properties Colligative properties are properties of solutions that depend only on the concentration of the solute particles (molecules or ions) not on the identity of the solute. There are four colligative properties • vapor pressure lowering, D P • boiling point elevation, D T B • freezing point depression, D T F • osmotic pressure, ± Each colligative property is directly proportional to a specific form of solute concentration • vapor pressure lowering, D P, is directly proportional to mole fraction, X. • boiling point elevation, D T B , is directly proportional to molality, m . • freezing point depression, D T F , is directly proportional to molality, m . • osmotic pressure, ±, is directly proportional to Molarity, M. 4. Ways of Expressing Concentration a. Mole fraction, X moles of component total moles X SOLUTE = mol SOLUTE = mol SOLUTE mol TOTAL mol SOLUTE + mol SOLVENT Example A solution contains 2.55 kg CH 2 OHCH 2 OH, ethylene glycol, in 2.00 kg water. Treat the water as the solvent. What is the mole fraction of ethylene glycol? Given: mass of solute and formula of solute mass of solvent Want: moles of solute and moles of solvent to calculate mole fraction Known: formula of water Calculate 1. Molar masses ethylene glycol: 2(12.0107) + 6(1.00794) + 2(15.9994) = 62.06784 g water: 2(1.00794) + 1(15.9994) = 18.01528 g
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course CHM 1220 taught by Professor Barber during the Fall '07 term at Wayne State University.

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Chapter_12_Part_2 - Chapter 12: Solutions Part 2...

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