17_chamra_EEG-Paper-1,Module1-4 - UNIT 3 p Poetic Diction Struture 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Objectives Study Guide What is Poetic Diction The

17_chamra_EEG-Paper-1,Module1-4 - UNIT 3 p Poetic...

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17 UNIT 3 a203 Poetic Diction Struture 3.0 Objectives 3.1 Study Guide 3.2 What is Poetic Diction? 3.3 The wordsworthian experiment 3.4 Poetry and Verse 3.5 Let us sum up 3.6 Comprehension Exercises 3.0 a203 OBJECTIVES This unit deals with the particular language used by poets. This unit enables you to : (a) Understand that the language of poetry need not be stylized : (b) Make a distinction between prose and peotry : (c) discern the difference between poetry and verse; (d) understand the approach of the Romantics to poetry. 3.1 a203 STUDY GUIDE This unit will impart you the knowledge that poets of the 17th century used Latinisms or Latinate expressions to enrich their poetic diction which also includes archaic or obsolete words. The Wordsworthian Experiment will tell you the common man’s language can well be the medium of poetic expression. In the sub-section “Poetry and Verse” you will know about the difference between Poetry and Prose which developed much later than Poetry. 3.2 a203 WHAT IS POETIC DICTION ? Regardless of the fact that poetry explores a wide range of subjects, poetry was, for a long time, to be written only in a prticular set of words constituting a particular language, called poetic diction. The poets of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries used Latinisms, Which, they felt, gave their poems an exotic flavour. The poets of the seventeenth century continued to use a highly stylized poetic diction, with archaisms or obsolete words. Milton used not only Latin words but also followed the rules of Latin Grammar in Paradise Lost.

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