Strategies for Teaching Language Arts to Young Children with Exceptionalities.docx

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Running head: STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS TO CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONALITIESStrategies for Teaching Language Arts to Young Children with Exceptionalities:Birth to Age EightBy Sheila A. AtwaterPrescott College
2STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS TO YOUNG CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONALITIESAbstractEducators play an important role in teaching young children with exceptionalities languagearts.More importantly is how an educator delivers pedagogy and how it is individualizedfor young children with exceptionalities.Staying current with proven methodologies andusing appropriate assistive technologies and assessments, benefit both the child andeducator.There have been misconceptions that parents/caregivers sometimes haveregarding the benefits of early exposure and reading to young children withexceptionalities.Early exposure is beneficial and can build language, play, and social skills.There are many different disabilities to understand and work with.It is important to beprepared with as many interventions/modifications to implement and make adjustments tothe curriculum, to be sure children are learning at their own pace and ability.Understanding which methods to apply can be a trial and error process and what works forsome children, may not work with others.Appropriate assessments, assistive technologies,and individualized pedagogy helps educators better meet the needs of diverse learners.
3STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS TO YOUNG CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONALITIESThere are different methods, assistive devices, and assessments available to implementinto pedagogy when teaching children with exceptionalities language arts.Some of theexceptionalities discussed in this paper may include autism spectrum disorder (ASD),intellectual disabilities (ID), seizure disorder (SD), low vision or blindness, hearing loss ordeafness, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).Lowry (2012) says that children with ASD don’t always develop literacy skills in the sameorder or along the same timeline as other children.Some children with ASD may be able toidentify andsound out letters and read words easily, but struggle with why people read andwrite, and comprehension.Children with ASD often have a hard time making eye contactand sharing their thoughts with words or gestures.It is best to begin by reading books forshort periods of time, and pointing and naming things as you go.To help develop languageread the same story again and again, find books that have repetitive phrases, and talk aboutthe pictures and text.Books that have buttons that the child can press and make sounds arealso encouraged (Lowry, 2010).There are four common misconceptions regarding autism and early literacy.Thefollowing are the misconceptions and methods to use to promote early literacy (Lowry,2012).

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Term
Fall
Professor
Aaron Deris
Tags
The Giver, Hearing impairment, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, exceptionalities

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