task 3 c489.docx - Task 3 C489-Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Instructor Kevin Sau Task 3 1.Compare the U.S healthcare system with the

task 3 c489.docx - Task 3 C489-Organizational Systems and...

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Task 3C489-Organizational Systems and Quality LeadershipInstructor: Kevin SauTask 31.Compare the U.S. healthcare system with the healthcare system of Great Britain, Japan, Germany, or Switzerland, by doing the following:The United States and Japan are well developed countries that provide healthcare in very different ways. While most US residents are covered by private and public health insurance it is not a universal health care system that assures all residents and visitors have access to healthcare.In contrast, the Japanese government has provided full healthcare to its residents for almost 60 years under a universal healthcare plan. Furthermore, Japan provides health insurance to its people for about half the cost that the US pays and has more control of medical costs while ensuring coverage for the most vulnerable populations (Ruggles, B., Xiong, A., Kyle, B., 2019). The Japanese government controls the fees that doctors and hospitals can charge and are revised every two years based on the needs and financial state of the country. The US government subsidizes health insurance costs that are paid by both employer and employee through deductibles and copays, while Japan’s healthcare system places responsibility of cost on employer and employee (Ruggles, B., Xiong, A., Kyle, B., 2019). Hospitals in the US can be nonprofit or for-profit and can be managed by corporations. However, hospitals in Japan are not allowed to be for profit and they must be managed by physicians. Both countries allow for private insurance, but Japan does not allow private health insurance companies to advertise or make a profit (Ruggles, B., Xiong, A., Kyle, B., 2019). According to Ruggles, Xiong, and Kyle (2019), Japan’s healthcare system is ranked as one of the top systems in the world, as it places high priority on preventative care. This probablycontributes to the higher life expectancy by almost three years over the US. Free screenings are offered for myriad illnesses and the prenatal programs are expansive. However, regarding everyday care, the use of general practitioners is not common among the Japanese. There is also no incentive for Japanese physicians to work in hospitals as the hours are long and the pay is low. Therefore, most physicians certify in subspecialties. Since there is no emphasis on primary care physician it is easy for Japanese residents to see a multitude of different doctors which can contribute to longer stays in hospitals for issues that are not necessarily acute. This also contributes to overcrowding in Japans emergency rooms and many people go unseen (Ruggles, B., Xiong, A., Kyle, B., 2019). While the US healthcare system lags behind Japan, and many other first world countries, in terms of cost and access to specialists, it provides much better access to emergency services due to the US regulatory systems and mandates to provide emergency care to everyone regardless of hospital capacity, Some studies have found that 40 % of hospital deaths in Japan could have been prevented if emergency services were more available(Ruggles, B., Xiong, A., Kyle, B., 2019). With regards to primary care and specialist visits in the
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