Simple Harmonic Motion - m equals the mass of the system,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Section 1 Simple Harmonic Motion April 9, 2007 Anthony Marro Jason Janscak, Jason Halwick Abstract In this experiment we will investigate the motion of a mass oscillating on a spring. The restoring force of the spring causes the mass to oscillate up and down, because of the change of potential energy into kinetic. And as the mass oscillates, the energy continually interchanges between kinetic. And because of friction the energy in the system continuously goes down/
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Section 1 Analysis: To find the spring constant ( k ) of the spring we take the negative of the distance the spring is pulled over the force exerted on the string. =- k xf The answer gives us a spring constant of .2052 This equation gives us the theoretical period (time) of oscillation. Where
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: m equals the mass of the system, and k is the spring constant. = T 2mk = . . T 2105 343 1525 T = 1.149 This equation gives us the experimental period (time) of oscillation. This T equals 1.2 This equation gives us the percent error Section 1 Our percent error in this lab was 2.959 Conclusion: This experiments purpose was to investigate the motion of a mass oscillating on a spring. The relationship between the equation for theoretical period correlates well with the data collected by the computer. The very small percent error 2.959% could have been caused by the usage of energy in the system and the air resistance that the system creates. A way to eliminate these errors is doing the experiment in a vacuum....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course PHYS 212L taught by Professor Huang,tai-yin during the Fall '07 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

Page1 / 3

Simple Harmonic Motion - m equals the mass of the system,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online