Chapter 1.docx - Chapter 1 Setting Place The house Kitchen...

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Chapter 1 Setting: Place; The house, Kitchen Time; One day , next Day Chapter 2 Setting: Place; Kithen, the church, new found glee Chapter 3 Setting: Place; De la Garza’s kitchen Chapter 5 Setting: Place; Village, San Antonio Time Flashback Chapter Six Setting: Place; Ranch, San Antonio Chronologoical Full Kilometer Long
Chapter 1 Like Water for Chocolate opens with a bit of wisdom from one of its central settings, the kitchen: to avoid tears when chopping onions, one must simply place a slice of onion on one's head. Onion-induced weeping quite literally sweeps the protagonist, Tita, into the world, as she is born in the kitchen, crying, amidst of flood of her mother's tears. Her mother, Mama Elena, is unable to produce milk (due to shock at the recent death of her husband) and consequently hands off Tita almost immediately to the house cook, Nacha, who rears the child in the kitchen. Surrounded by the colors, smells, and routines of Nacha's kitchen, Tita grows up understanding the world in terms of food. She enjoys her isolation in the domain of the kitchen. Outside the kitchen, Tita follows the demanding regimen that Mama Elena sets for her daughters. Life is full of cooking, cleaning, sewing, and prayer. This routine is interrupted one day by Tita's timid announcement that a suitor, Pedro Muzquiz, would like to pay her a visit. Mama Elena greets this announcement with indignation, invoking the De La Garza family tradition that the youngest daughter is to remain unmarried so that she can care for the matriarch in the matriarch's old age. Tita is dismayed by this rigid tradition. Outwardly, she submits to Mama Elena's wishes, but privately she questions the family tradition and maintains her feelings for Pedro. The next day, Pedro and his father arrive at the house unannounced to ask for Tita's hand. Mama Elena refuses this marriage proposal, offering instead the hand of her second daughter, Rosaura. Mama Elena's bold disregard for Tita's feelings shocks the household, but Pedro and his father agree to the arrangement. Nacha, the maid, claims to
have overheard Pedro confess to his father that he has accepted the marriage to Rosaura because it is the only way to be near Tita. However, Tita is not consoled by the report of this admission. Not even the Christmas Roll, her favorite food, can cure Tita of her sadness. She is struck by a feeling of cold; to warm herself, she resumes work on a bedspread, which she had begun crocheting when she and Pedro first began to talk of marriage. Chapter 2 The fateful wedding of Pedro and Rosaura has the De La Garza household in a tremendous blur of activity. The kitchen is consumed with the preparation of the Chabela Wedding Cake, the recipe for which begins this chapter.

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