Intro to Psych: Final Paper - The Causes and Effects of...

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The Causes and Effects of Stress peopleSayndia SandoDr. Cara DiYanniIntroduction to Psychology 100-D111/26/18
Sando 1Introduction:Stress is best described as the feeling of physical or emotional tension as a result of an internal or external trigger. Due to its intriguing nature, I have chosen this as the topic for all three of my research articles. I have chosen three studies to focus on: A study that looked at the relation of certain genotypes to the stress response in children ages 8-11 (Mueller et al, 2012), a study that looks at the effect of a woman's menstrual cycle on her stress levels and physical performance ability (Lustyk et al, 2010), and a study on some of the misconceptions about the hormone cortisol, specifically the one produced by hair follicles, in relation to stress (Gerber et al., 2017). So each of the empirical studies listed dealt with stress in one way or another. This paper will explore why some people are more vulnerable to stress than others, and what causes this to be so. The answers to these questions were sought out by looking at the effects of age, gender, and genetics on stress, as well as the impact on task performanceAge:A stress snapshot done by the American Psychological Association a few years ago supports that younger generations experience higher levels of stress than their predecessors (American Psychological Association). However, recent studies have now been done alluding as to why that is. A 2011 study done by Mueller looked at how genetic components in the alleles of children ages 8 to 11 set them to add an early disposition to experience stress. (Mueller et al, 2012). Age also plays a role for women ages 18-45, who are also highly susceptible to stress due to their menstrual cycles. Because the ages of the women were key in the experiment, the study made sure to exclude those of a premenstrual age, those younger than 17 years old, and those of menopausal age, those over 45 years old (Lustyk et al, 2010) One last study that looked at the varying stress response was by Geber in 2012. It testing to find out if the cortisol found in the
Sando 2hair follicles (HCC), had the same implication of chronic stress in children as it did with adults. (Gerber et al., 2012). The study found that although cortisol served as a prevalent biomarker for chronic stress in adults, its implications were not the same for children. Although they indicated BMI and somatic occurrences in children, they did not indicate stress (Gerber et al., 2012).

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