socio 16.pdf - Gender Crime and Desistance Toward a Theory of Cognitive Transformation Author(s Peggy C Giordano Stephen A Cernkovich and Jennifer L

socio 16.pdf - Gender Crime and Desistance Toward a Theory...

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Gender, Crime, and Desistance: Toward a Theory of Cognitive Transformation Author(s): Peggy C. Giordano, Stephen A. Cernkovich, and Jennifer L. Rudolph Reviewed work(s): Source: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 107, No. 4 (January 2002), pp. 990-1064 Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: . Accessed: 14/01/2013 16:04 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] . The University of Chicago Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to American Journal of Sociology. This content downloaded on Mon, 14 Jan 2013 16:04:33 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
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990 AJS Volume 107 Number 4 (January 2002): 990–1064 2002 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. 0002-9602/2002/10704-0004$10.00 Gender, Crime, and Desistance: Toward a Theory of Cognitive Transformation 1 Peggy C. Giordano, Stephen A. Cernkovich, and Jennifer L. Rudolph Bowling Green State University This article analyzes data derived from the first detailed long-term follow-up of a sample of serious adolescent female delinquents and similarly situated males. Neither marital attachment nor job sta- bility, factors frequently associated with male desistance from crime, were strongly related to female or male desistance. A symbolic- interactionist perspective on desistance is developed as a counter- point to Sampson and Laub’s theory of informal social control, and life history narratives are used to illustrate the perspective. This cognitive theory is generally compatible with a control approach but ( a ) adds specificity regarding underlying change mechanisms, ( b ) explains some negative cases, and ( c ) fits well with life course challenges facing contemporary serious female (and more provi- sionally male) offenders. In a series of recent analyses, Robert Sampson and John Laub highlight the importance of marital attachment and job stability as key factors associated with desistance from crime (Laub, Nagin, and Sampson 1998; Laub and Sampson 1993; Sampson and Laub 1993). While the delinquents they studied were more likely than others to continue to offend as adults, there was considerable variability in the success of their adult transitions and in the timing of movement away from a criminal lifestyle. Sampson and Laub develop a social control explanation that emphasizes the gradual 1 This research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health MH29095 and MH46410. The authors wish to acknowledge H. Theodore Groat, a coinvestigator on this project, who contributed greatly to the collection and analyses of these data and the conceptual framework developed in this article. We have also
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