10_sample_final_F_06(2)

10_sample_final_F_06(2) - Statistics Professor Esfandiari...

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Statistics Professor Esfandiari Sample final Question 1) In a given population, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was measured in each individual and then they were followed for 10 years. The following table shows the number of individuals who were alive or dead at the end of that period. DBP (mm Hg) Dead Alive Total High (100+) 124 295 419 Low (99 or less) 764 3851 4615 Total 888 4146 5034 a) What is the probability that an individual selected randomly from this population died in 10 years? b) Given that a person has high DBP, What is the probability that s(he) died in 10 years? c) In this population, is high DBP independent of dying in 10 years? Why? Question 2) For a particular population, the following table shows the percentage of people who are retired, classified by age group: Age Group (years) % Retired P(Not Retired) 60-64 20 0.8 65-69 50 0.5 70+ 80 0.2 Three unrelated people, one aged 62 years, the second 66 years and the third 76 years, are selected at random from this population. a) What is the probability that at least one of them is retired? b) What is the probability that all of them are retired? c) What is the probability that none of them are retired?
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Question 3) Suppose that you are hired to work with a statistician that works with a private childrens’ hospital in Los Angeles. They have the following information on their data base for 800 infants that were born in 2004. Weight of new born Height of new born Age of the mother Is the mother a smoke or not The statistician asks you to run the relevant data for answering the following questions: a) What is the mean and the standard deviation of the weight and height for the 800 new borns? b) Is the average weight of the new borns for this hospital different from the national average weight of seven pounds? c) Is the percentage of the mothers who smoke during pregnancy lower than the national average of female smokers in the US? Is (a) an example of conducting inferential or descriptive statistics and why? Is (b) an example of conducting inferential or descriptive statistics and why? Is (c) an example of conducting inferential or descriptive statistics and why? Question 4) At a major university three methods of MCAT preparation (medical school admission test) is offered to help the students who want to pursue a career in medicine. These methods include : 1) Attending five hours of lecture every week for six weeks, 2) participation in an on-line tutoring program for five hours a week for six weeks, 3) and doing none of the above(control group). 300 students volunteer to participate in this program. Of these students 50% are science major and 50% are not.,50% are male and 50% are female. They also vary with
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10_sample_final_F_06(2) - Statistics Professor Esfandiari...

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