astronomy midterm - Question 1 Score 1/1 This star is the...

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Question 1: Score 1/1 This star is the closest to the north celestial pole. enter the name of the star. (not "North Star") Your Answer: polaris Correct Answer: Polaris Question 2: Score 0/1 I saw the moon, and it was gibbous, bright on the right side, directly overhead. What time was it? Your Answer: midnight Comment: Question 3: Score 0/1 One arc second in shift of position in three months is relative to what distance (name the unit only)? Your Answer: arc units Question 4: Score 0/1 If a star is measured as shifting 0.6 arc seconds in a three month period, as viewed from the earth, how far away is it in light years? (give number only, to one decimal place, units are light years but do not enter units.) Your Answer: Question 5: Score 1/1 The scientific study of the universe is called Your Answer: astronomy Correct Answer: astronomy Question 6: Score 1/1 One parsec is how many light years? enter the number only to two decimal places, no units. Your Answer: 3.26 Correct Answer: 3.26 Question 7: Score 1/1
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Meteor showers are caused by Your Answer: debris remaining in space from a long passed comet, burning up in earth's atmosphere Correct Answer: debris remaining in space from a long passed comet, burning up in earth's atmosphere Comment: Question 8: Score 1/1 This concept explains how an apparent shift in position can be used to calculate distance, and why you need to be lined up straight with a gauge to read it correctly. Your Answer: parallax Correct Answer: parallax Question 9: Score 0/1 Which of the following are asterisms, not constellations? mark as many as apply.) Choice Selected Big Dipper No [answer withheld] Cassiopea Yes [answer withheld] Taurus No [answer withheld] Pleiades Yes [answer withheld] Orion No [answer withheld] Total correct answers: 0 Partial Grading Explained Question 10: Score 0/1 He first postulated the heliocentric arrangement of sun and planets. What was his name? Enter his last name only. Your Answer: galileo Question 11: Score 0/1 Seasons change due to Your Answer: change in tilt of the earth's axis Question 12: Score 0/1
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A lunar eclipse Your Answer: is most likely to occur during the new moon Question 13: Score 0/1 The earth's north pole (axis) Your Answer: tilts 33.5 degrees Question 14: Score 0/1 I saw the moon, with a thin bright sliver on the right side towards the bottom, in the western sky, about 30 degrees above the horizon. What time was it? Your Answer: 7 am Comment: Question 15: Score 1/1 He figured out gravity, and explained the heliocentric model with gravitational attraction. What was his name? enter his last name only. Your Answer: newton Correct Answer: Newton Question 16: Score 1/1 How many degrees are visible from one horizon to the other? Enter a number only. no units. Your Answer: 180 Correct Answer: 180 Question 17: Score 0/1 Which of the following are individual stars, not constellations? mark as many as apply.) Choice Selected Deneb No [answer withheld] Cygnus Yes [answer withheld] Betelgeuse Yes [answer withheld] Draco Yes [answer withheld] Polaris Yes [answer withheld]
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Total correct answers: 0 Partial Grading Explained Question 18:
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