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Lecture 29 (5-3) - Example Diabetes • “Late onset,”...

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Human Adaptations: Contemporary Health in Evolutionary Perspective Human Diets The vast majority of human existence relied on a hunting/gathering subsistence strategy Food production (horticulture, agriculture, animal husbandry) are recent adaptations, less than 10,000 years old Ancestral diet was high in animal protein, but low in fat Ancestral Human Diets High protein/low saturated fat High in complex carbohydrates (especially fiber) Low sodium High calcium Modern industrialized nations’ diets are the opposite (contemporary diseases) Evolutionary Tradeoffs Ability to store fat “feast or famine” biological adaptation “constant feast” in industrialized societies “constant famine” for some parts of developing world
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Unformatted text preview: Example: Diabetes • “Late onset,” type 2, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus • In US it was 27th leading cause of death in 1900 • In US it was 7th leading cause of death in 2006 • Highly associated with obesity Yet Another Downside to Globalization • Projected increase in diabetes rates for the decade 2000-2010 – 57% in Asia – 50% in Africa – 44% in South America – 23% in North America “Food Inequality” • Billions of humans are nutritionally dependent on cereal grains • Billions face malnutrition, undernutrition and starvation • Political and economic forces affect the distribution of foods...
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