Nutrition-minerals etc..

Nutrition-minerals etc.. - Nutrition 3/10/08 10/03/2008...

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Unformatted text preview: Nutrition 3/10/08 10/03/2008 16:01:00 ← Minerals • Solid, crystalline substances • Do NOT contain carbon • Are not broken down by chemical processes like digestion • Able to carry an electrical charge • Major Minerals o Required in larger amounts o 100 mg/day are needed o calcium- is the most abundant major mineral in the body is required to form and maintain bones and teeth assists with acid-base balance critical for transmission of nerve impulses assists I muscle contraction recommended intake AI values vary with age and gender Intake is limited by bioavailability • The amount that can be absorbed Sources- Skim milk, low-fat cheese, nonfat yogurt, green leafy vegetables RDA- 1000-1300 mg/day UL- 2500 mg/day Absorption varies by need Excessive absorption can lead to crystal precipitation in soft tissue Too much? Excess calcium is excreted from the body Calcium supplements can lead to mineral imbalances Not enough? Long term consequence of inadequate consumption makes you more susceptible to osteoporosis. Regulations Vitamin D regulates blood calcium levels • If blood calcium levels are low o Vitamin D stimulates calbindin synthesis Calbindin transports calcium from gut to bloodstream o Vitamin D stimulates bone resorption o Vitamin d stimulated calcium retention from kidneys o sodium- functions fluid and electrolyte balance associated with blood pressure and pH balance in the body required for nerve impulse transmission assists in the transport of certain nutrients (e.g. glucose) into body cells Recommended intake AI is 1.5g/day Upper limit- 2400 mg/day US average- +3300 mg/day Sources Processed foods are surprisingly high in sodium Hypertension High blood pressure Not necessarily caused by sodium, but hypertension is more common in people who consume more sodium DASH diet ( Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Increase of fruits, veggies, nuts, whole grains, and low fat dairy Reduction in butter, red fatty meat, and sodium Magnesium, potassium, calcium, protein, fiber High sodium diets increase calcium in the urine Hyponatremia Low blood sodium levels • Water intoxication • 2002 Boston Marathon death • Nintendo Wii- radio promo • o o potassium functions balance of fluids and sodium very important in muscle contractions and transmission of nerve impulses high potassium intake helps maintain a lower blood pressure Recommended Intake AI 4.7g/day Sources of Potassium Processed foods are usually low in potassium...
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course NATS 104 taught by Professor Lewis during the Spring '08 term at Arizona.

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Nutrition-minerals etc.. - Nutrition 3/10/08 10/03/2008...

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