Indirect Questions Translation Sheet Fall 2017 Latin III.docx

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Indirect Questions Translation Sheet Latin III Nomen________________________ Tempus__________ Dies__________________________ Please identify the indirect question in each of the following passages. Then translate and answer the comprehension questions. 1. “All that is Left” (CIL 1.1732,3; 9.1837) If you ask who or what i am, Behold! I’m ash and burnt up embers. SI QUAERIS QUAE SIM, CINIS, EN, ET TOSTA FAVILLA. From an epitaph found at Beneventum (Benevento, italy)… The deceased, Helvia Prima, is to be understood speaking the line. What conception of the afterlife is implied by this sentiment? Si – if quaero—seek, ask, inquire cinis, cinis m. – ashes, ash En –(interjection) look! Behold! (translate first in its clause) Torreo, torrere, torrui, tostum – burn Favilla, ae f. – ashes, embers 2. “Eternal Joys” ( CIL 6.17106, 2-4) While I lived, I learned what death was, what the life of a human being was, from where i grasp the eternal pleasures of the soul. DUM VIXI · DIDICI · QUAE · MORS · QUAE · VITA · HOMINIS · ESSET AETERNA · UNDE · ANIMAE · GAUDIA · PERCIPIO Inscription found in Rome beneath a statue of a sitting philosopher. What conception of the afterlife is implied by the sentiment expressed here. Dum --- While vivo, vivere, vixi – live disco, discere, didici – learn, come to understand Mors, mortis f. – death unde – whence, from where (translate first in its clause) Gaudium, gaudii n. – joy, pleasure percipio, percipere, percepi, perceptum – grasp, comprehend 3. “ Read On” ( CIL 5.5719) You who desired to know what limbs lie dead in this tomb will learn provided that you read again these little verses. HOC · QUI · SCIRE · CUPIS · IACEANT · QUAE · MEMBRA SEPULCRO DISCES · DUM · RELEGAS · HOS · MODO · VERSICULOS An epitaph found near Mediolanum (Milan, Italy), now lost. Ironically, the identification of the deceased, promised to those who read the “little verses” that follow, was impossible at least as early as the 17 th century, when it was noted that the next four lines of text were missing. The words above are addressed to any passerby. Prose order: Tu qui cupis scire quae membra iaceant in hoc sepulcro disces dummodo relegas hos versiculos. membrum, membri n. – limb iaceo, iacere, iacui – lie, lie dead, repose sepulcrum, sepulcri n. – grave, tomb dummodo (+subjunctive) --- provided that Passages 1-3 taken from By Roman Hands: Inscriptions and Graffiti for Students of Latin, by Matthew Hartnet. Focus Publishing, Inc. 2008. Pages 89-90.
relego, relegere, relegi, relectum – read again versiculus, versiculi m. – verse 4. “A Fickle Girl” Martial, Epigrammata III. 90 Galla wants and doesnt want to give me kisses.Because she wants and does not want to give kisses. I’m able to say what she wants. Vult, non vult dare Galla mihi; nec dicere possum, Quod vult et non vult, quid sibi Galla velit. Galla is apparently a fickle girlfriend of Martial’s. Prose Order. Galla vult, non vult dare mihi; Quod vult et non vult, non possum dicere quid sibi Gallia velit.

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