Equus Reflection # 3 - Heather Kane Kane 1 Mrs Boring AP English 20 December 2017 \u201cEquus\u201d Final Thoughts Scene 16 is the first time the audience

Equus Reflection # 3 - Heather Kane Kane 1 Mrs Boring AP...

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Heather Kane Kane 1 Mrs. Boring AP English 20 December 2017 “Equus”: Final Thoughts Scene 16 is the first time the audience actually gets to see Alan interact with the horses at the stables. Then after the boy accuses Dysart of Putting his nose into other people's business, “That's all you are. Bloody Nosey Parker! Just like Dad,” (Act 1 Scene 16) and a shrewd, Dysart has a heart to heart with Hesther. The next attempt the shrink makes with Alan is through hypnosis. While he's in a hypnotic state, Alan acts out how he does his ceremonial ritual with the horses at the stable. The boy often compares the horse to Christ, “His last supper… Take my sins. Eat them for my sake,” (Act 1 Scene 21). However instead of the horse god Equus making a sacrifice for others’ sins, Alan is the sacrifice. He says that when he jumps up onto the horse it feels as if there are knives piercing his legs. Then later in Act 2 Dysart makes another attempt at finding out the truth by giving Alan a placebo pill, which he thinks is a truth serum. “Under” this truth serum, the teenager acts out what happened the night of the accident. The audience learns that Alan’s father Frank is untruthful to his family. He constantly works late watching dirty cinemas. After the run in with Frank at the theater, Alan and Jill go to the stables. As they begin to interact with each other intimately the boy freaks out, “Every time I kissed her- He was in the way,” (Act 2 Scene 33). Alan's talking about how his god Equus completely controls him. Alan is just a toy of Equus, he is the God’s possession. Equus is always watching Alan, until the point that Alan snaps from the hysteria his God’s all seeing eyes bring, “As they trample at him, the boy leaps desperately at them, jumping high and naked in the Kane 2 dark, slashing at their heads with arms upraised…” (Act 2 Scene 34). Dysart comforts the boy
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and promises that he will take Alan’s pain away. Religion and worship is a motif in this section of the play. It plays into the theme that
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