NutritionTest5

NutritionTest5 - Chapter 12 Food Safety Potential problems...

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Chapter 12 Food Safety Potential problems in food supply Microbial foodbourne illness Natural toxins Residues in foods Nutrients in foods Food additives GM foods Cost of Food Borne Disease ~76 million Food Borne Illnesses Annually in US ~5,000 - Deaths Annually ~ $ Billions in Social and Medical Costs Less than 5% reported Foodborne illness is unreported Elderly have increased susceptibility because of their decreased immune function and increased exposure (young children and chronically ill as well.) What are microorganisms? Living organisms Microbes Roles of microorganisms in foods Infections: most common form of food illness. Rarely fatal except in immunocompromised Intoxications: Food Borne Intoxications Bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus Clostridium botulinum – causes botulism Bacillus cereus Infant Botulism Botox – can stop sweat glands from producing and may sweeten armpit odors Botulism intoxication- found everywhere. Caused by home canning. Food not killed by cooking it not long enough. Thrives it air tight spaces. Honey is not recommended in the first year of your life because of spores. Iron-fortified baby formula is also a contributing factor of botulism Warning signs – double vision, weak muscles
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Food Borne Intoxications Molds - Claviceps purpurea – ergot (LSD) - rye Aspergillus – aflotoxins ( Corn, peanuts, barley) Dinoflagellates - Algae Phytoplankton – ‘red tide’ Food Borne Infections Bacteria - Salmonella –Schwann’s truck (6-48hr) Campylobacter – most common (2-5d) Enteropathogenic E. Coli Hemorrhagic colitis (3-9d) Shigella (1-2d) Listeria monocytogenes (7-30d) Vibrio – cholera, oysters parahaemolyticus vulnificus E. Coli O157:H7 – alfalfa sprouts, spinach, undercooked beef Salmonellosis - comes from raw, unpasturized eggs. Causes fever Salmonella enteritidis Preventing Salmonellosis from eggs Avoid eating raw eggs or foods containing raw eggs Store eggs at < 40 ° F Cook thoroughly Not runny Casseroles 160 ° F Serve safely Hot > 140 ° F Cold < 40 ° F Reheat to 165 ° F Chill properly
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Campylobacter One of most common foodborne illness - 2 1/2 times more than Salmonella Listeriosis – Listeria monocytogenes Vibrio vulnificus – raw, undercooked seafood. Non-fecal Common Parasitical Hazards in Food Retail Operation Cryptosporidium parvum Giardia lamblia Trichinella spiralis Viruses- Hepatitis A is most common BSE – Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease) started from feeding cows spinal cords and brains from other animals in order to put on more weight Microbiological Food Safety Marketplace – sanitation Industry Controls Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) within steps where ones job is to identify what goes wrong – look for infected carcasses Identify “critical control points” Develop and implement a plan to prevent potential microbial hazards
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NutritionTest5 - Chapter 12 Food Safety Potential problems...

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