Ciderhouse Rules - Cider House Rules By Brian Fennie PA 344...

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Cider House Rules By Brian Fennie PA 344 How wonderful would it be if there were no government to enact and enforce
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laws, a sense of anarchy or the ability to do whatever one pleases whenever one pleases, without having to worry about punishments or negative consequences whatsoever? One could burglarize stores, drive at whatever speed they want, claim any piece of land they chose and maybe even murder anyone they disagreed with because they knew they would not be reprimanded. Does this sound appealing? Well, if it does, then you are out of luck. Since the beginning of time as we know it, people have had to follow specific rules and behave accordingly in order to keep a sense of balance and structure for society and all of the people who call it home. In order to keep this delicate balance where people respect one another and act rationally, certain norms and laws have been engrained into theses societies that keep people in line and punish people who step out of line. Without these rules, laws and norms, informal or not, life in these communities would be extremely difficult and would end up in complete disarray. Donald Black and Lon Fuller, two scholars in the field of law, each define what they believe “law” is. Black argues that “law” is governmental, social control. Basically, laws are guidelines that people must follow in order to not be punished and to keep social order and the status quo. This would include behaviors such as theft, murder, and narcotics abuse, what have you. According to Black, laws are simply a means to control and enforce order in a population. Lon Fuller argues that “law” is the subjection of human conduct to the governance of rules. He also states that not all rules are officially made and enforced by government, but are still followed because people are socialized to act in certain ways and also to maintain the status quo. “Law”, be it formal, governmentally enacted law, or informal, simple rules and everyday norms, is extremely important in how humans go about their everyday lives. This notion of informal norms 2
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and formal laws is notably present in the character’s lives throughout the film, Cider House Rules . This film takes place in two extremely different settings, one being an extremely rural, isolated orphanage in the back country of Maine called St. Cloud Orphanage, and the other only a short distance away close to the state line. This location is called the Cider House. Both of these venues breed a great deal of both informal norms and formal laws that the characters must abide by as to create an environment that is as comfortable and fair as possible. Both the Cider House tenants and the Orphanage residents exhibit behaviors that are legal, illegal, normal, and abnormal and inevitably test boundaries of the institution and the socially constructed ideals associated with each locale.
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Ciderhouse Rules - Cider House Rules By Brian Fennie PA 344...

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