Heouh.docx - Refugee Aff Novices 1AC Plan Plan The United...

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Refugee Aff Novices
1AC
PlanPlan: The United States federal government should substantially increase its resettlement of refugees in the United States.
Advantage one- SofPowerTrump has pushed sof power to the brink – reversing current stance on refugees cap is keyToosi 17(Nahal, foreign affairs correspondent at POLITICO, “Lawmakers fear Trump will undercut America's 'soft power'”, POLITICO, -america-soft-power-231253) ALHLawmakers and U.S. officials who have championed foreign aid, democracy and human rights fear thatPresident-elect Donald Trump will financially and rhetorically cripple America's non-military influence around the world— damage that could prove harder to repair than the kind inflicted by George W. Bush's use of torture. By pledging to block Syrian refugees from U.S. shores, supporting the use of waterboarding and suggesting the U.S. isn't getting enough out of "deals" with its allies, Trump badly hurt America's reputationduring the campaign. His victory was so shocking that some stakeholders now wonder whether the Trump era will mark the end of America's "soft power." "Under Donald Trump ... I would be very concerned about the importance of soft power," said Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and a top promoter of human rights legislation. "It does affect our national security, and it’s a challenge even under ideal circumstances." "Soft power" is a loosely defined term that covers how a country amasses influence without coercion or payment. It can include promoting pop culture or offering earthquake relief. Some stretch it toinclude democracy promotion and offering development aid, if the purpose or side effect is to gain goodwill. Proponents argue that, used properly, U.S. soft power can help reduce potential threats facing America. President Barack Obama addresses the media during a news conference at the NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, July 9, 2016. NATO chief to Trump: 'Going alone is not an option' By POLITICO STAFF Christian Whiton, an informal adviser to Trump, dismissed worries that the Republican president-elect would undercut America's international influence. Trump, Whiton insisted, would fight for human rights and democratic movements in the face of radical Islamists in countries such as Iran. "I wouldn’t expect to see drastic cuts or elimination of foreign aid, but I would expect to see it redirected toward what the incoming president sees as our key national interests," added Whiton, who stressed that he was not officially speaking on behalf of the president-elect's team. The aid community, for one, has little confidence that Trump will make it a priority. The United States provides more than $30 billion a year to other countries in foreign assistance, much of it in humanitarian aid and on global health efforts. Some in the field worry Trump will gut the U.S. Agency for International Development and other foreign assistance programs in favor of his stated "America First"

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