Week 7 Reading Notes.docx - Week 7 Reading Notes Give Me...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

Week 7 Reading Notes: Give Me Liberty, Ch. 13Week 7: The Road to WarWe enter our last two weeks of reading and discussion this week. After six very busy sessions, we have a bit of a lighter workload this time: just one chapter to read and the regular conference assignment. I hope you'll use the extra time this week to start preparing for your final exam, which will be due on May 10. I'll be using the time to catch up on grading! In Week 6, we read about a wide range of reform movements in the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century, including abolitionism. We also learned about the entrenchment of slavery in Southern politics and economics, which made the work of the abolitionists that much more difficult. And we explored what life was like for slaves, including family dynamics, religion, and possibilities for resistance. Those two chapters were good preparation for our reading this week, which takes us through the events that led to the start of the Civil War.Let's take a closer look...KEY TERMS: CHAPTER 13a. Battle of San Jacintob. Mexican Warc. Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgod. Commodore Matthew Perrye. Wilmot Provisof. Free Soil partyg. Compromise of 1850h. Fugitive Slave Acti. Kansas-Nebraska Actj. Republican partyk. Know-Northing partyl. Bleeding Kansasm. Dred Scott decisionn. Lecompton Constitutiono. Abraham Lincolnp. Lincoln-Douglas debatesq. John Brownr. Ostend Manifestos. Crittenden Compromiset. Confederate States of Americau. Jefferson Davisv. Fort SumterAs you can see from the long list of key terms above, this is an action-packed chapter that begins with one armed conflict(the Mexican War) and ends with another (the onset of the Civil War). In many ways, one can be said to be the cause -- or at least one of the causes -- of the other. Foner tells us that the intensification of the longtime conflict between the free states of the North and the slave states of the South came about because of the acquisition of new territories in the west. 300,000 people settled in Oregon and California from points east between 1840 and 1860.About 1 million square miles of these new western territories were ceded to the United States as a result of the Mexican War. The conflict was precipitated by the desire to annex California. But the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that
ended the war gave the US not only California but also New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and Texas (which was a nation of its own, having won its independence from Mexico in 1836). Settlers poured into the west, particularly after gold was discovered in California in 1848.But would these new territories permit slavery or not? As we recall from our earlier reading, Congress took pains to observe a careful balance in the number of slave and free states through measures like the Missouri Compromise. The addition of the new territories opened the debate again, with important political consequences. Northern congressmen

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture