FUERZA-by-Marisa-Inda-Ebook2.pdf - TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRO BACKGROUND 4 INTRO TO BODYBUILDING 7 TRAINING WHILE PREGNANT 12 TRANSITION TO POWERLIFTING 18

FUERZA-by-Marisa-Inda-Ebook2.pdf - TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRO...

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3 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRO & BACKGROUND INTRO TO BODYBUILDING TRAINING WHILE PREGNANT TRANSITION TO POWERLIFTING TRAINING THE SQUAT TRAINING THE BENCH TRAINING THE DEADLIFT STRENGTH AS THE PATH TO AESTHETICS CALISTHENICS CARDIO NUTRITION PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER F.A.Q. - WOMEN & WEIGHT LIFTING PROGRAM BEGINNER PROGRAM MOMSTRONG PROGRAM POWERLIFTING PROGRAM WORLD RECORD PROGRAM PHYSIQUE 4 7 12 18 22 28 34 40 42 46 48 55 57 59 66 79 92 107 CONTENTS
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4 FUERZA: A FEMALE’S GUIDE TO STRENGTH & PHYSIQUE BACKGROUND I would like to thank you for taking the time to purchase and read this book. I have been lifting weights for more than half my life, and it gives me so much joy to share what I have learned-- especially since I had to learn by trial and error in the pre-social media age. As I look back at that time, it wasn’t exactly trendy to be a female stepping foot into male dominated gyms, and I recognize how important it is to empower other women to do so with more knowledge and less fear than I had. Let me take a step back, though, and give you a brief glimpse into my background and childhood, so you have a better understanding of what led me into the gym for the first time at 17 years old. I’m pretty fortunate I come from good stock--I like to say I’m strong because of my Sangre. My father is Basque and an immigrant from Spain--if you haven’t heard about the Basque stone lifters I suggest you Google it; they are some of the strongest people around, and my Aita is no exception. My INTRO
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5 INTRO & BACKGROUND mom is Mexican and if there is one thing that speaks volumes about her mental toughness it would have to be that she has had root canals done sans Novocain (interesting side note, like her, all cavities I ever had were also done with no numbing and the mental toughness torch has been passed to my daughter who does the same). One of the most important lessons my mother taught me was no matter what always tira pa’delante (always go forward). Life throws a lot of curveballs. It’s important to always keep moving forward; even if it’s at a snail’s pace, you’re still making progress. This is true not only in life but in lifting where progress takes years and is sometimes measured in small increments (a.k.a. fractional plates). Growing up on a farm, I spent a lot of time outside, and I was very much a tomboy. I used to jump on-and-off the tailgate of the truck as hay was being unloaded, flipped around on the furniture, and I’d jump from the chicken coop to the tractors nearby--pretty sure I had invented Parkour before it became a thing. My mom decided to enroll me in gymnastics so I wouldn’t hurt myself at home. I instantly fell in love with it, and I’m a huge proponent for every kid being enrolled in tumbling early on because I think it has the best carry over to every other sport. Gymnastics taught me spatial awareness, gave me increased leg, back and shoulder flexibility, explosive power, and increased upper body strength, which many women in strength sports lack. I credit gymnastics for my good technique in lifting today. Unfortunately, it was a very expensive sport,
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  • Spring '18
  • The Land, Weight training, powerlifting, Bench press

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