1-12.docx - FANNY PRICE u201cShrinking from...

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FANNY PRICE“Shrinking from notice”(she is different and knows it, due to which she dislikes being the centreof attention. It is this silent passivity that enables her to observe and evaluate the people around her more clearly)“Wicked thing for her not to be happy” (This novel shows how passive characters like Fanny areoften misunderstood, as she is now by Mrs. Norris, who expects her to be grateful for the societaladvantages she will gain rather than be upset for the home and family she has to leave behind.)“maid-servants sneered at her clothes”“Little heart”(invokes sympathy for Fanny as we are reminded of how much she is forced to go through at such a young age)“The rooms were too large for her to move in”“Thought it a bold measure”(this is when Edmund sys his father will frank her letter to William,and shows how uncomfortable she is in Mansfield Park as well as the extent of her fear towards its inhabitants—it is not yet the home she later realises it to be)“Kept back as she was by every body else”“I shall be very sorry to go”,“faltering voice”(shows her growing attachment to Mansfield Park)“I love this house and everything in it”(contrast to her previous fear)“Would he (Sir Thomas) only have smiled upon her and called her ‘my dear Fanny’”“No share in the festivities of the season” (passivity and lack of vivaciousness)“A mind which had seldom known a pause in its alarms or embarrassments” (Austen reveals herto be consumed with thoughts of her awkwardness as well as shows how self-aware she is)“I should like to see Sotherton before it is cut down” (Focuses on the cutting down of the alley rather than the improvements—she sees change in the sense of development and renewal as a tool to cut away an important part of the original object—reflects upon her maintenance and respect for the old Mansfield ways)“his determined silence obliged her” (shows her passive and timid nature—Edmund pushes Fanny to stand up for herself and face her fears, as he has been doing since they first became close—shows intimacy as well as understanding between them)“danger of dissimilarity, for he (Edmund) was in line of admiration of Miss Crawford, which might lead him where Fanny could not follow”(highlights Edmund’s blindness to Mary’s true character due to his affection for her—shows the restrictions imposed on people by marriage, and
how, though it leads to the formation of a strong connection, it may also lead to ruin of another—reveals how Fanny depends on and admires Edmund)“almost overpowered with gratitude that he should be asking her leave for it” (despite Edmund having bought the horse, he still asks Fanny’s permission before taking it for Mary, which shows his fair, undiscriminating, kind nature—also shows a little similarity in the feelings of Edmund and Fanny, for the former’s admiration of Mary causes him to exaggerate her goodness and overlook her flaws, while the latter’s admiration for the former causes her to feel more strongly for his kind actions than is necessary)

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