QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks.pdf - QuickSort GeeksforGeeks es QuickSort Like Merge Sort QuickSort is a Divide and Conquer algorithm It picks an element as

QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks.pdf - QuickSort GeeksforGeeks es...

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1/20/2020 QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks 1/18 QuickSort Like Merge Sort , QuickSort is a Divide and Conquer algorithm. It picks an element as pivot and partitions the given array around the picked pivot. There are many different versions of quickSort that pick pivot in different ways. 1. Always pick ±rst element as pivot. 2. Always pick last element as pivot (implemented below) 3. Pick a random element as pivot. 4. Pick median as pivot. The key process in quickSort is partition(). Target of partitions is, given an array and an element x of array as pivot, put x at its correct position in sorted array and put all smaller elements (smaller than x) before x, and put all greater elements (greater than x) after x. All this should be done in linear time. Pseudo Code for recursive QuickSort function : Custom Search es in Hire with us! 10% OFF on Royalty-free Videos
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1/20/2020 QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks 2/18 /* low --> Starting index, high --> Ending index */ quickSort(arr[], low, high) { if (low < high) { /* pi is partitioning index, arr[pi] is now at right place */ pi = partition(arr, low, high); quickSort(arr, low, pi - 1); // Before pi quickSort(arr, pi + 1, high); // After pi } }
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1/20/2020 QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks 3/18 Partition Algorithm There can be many ways to do partition, following pseudo code adopts the method given in CLRS book. The logic is simple, we start from the leftmost element and keep track of index of smaller (or equal to) elements as i. While traversing, if we ±nd a smaller element, we swap current element with arr[i]. Otherwise we ignore current element. /* low --> Starting index, high --> Ending index */ quickSort(arr[], low, high) { if (low < high) { /* pi is partitioning index, arr[pi] is now at right place */ pi = partition(arr, low, high); quickSort(arr, low, pi - 1); // Before pi quickSort(arr, pi + 1, high); // After pi } } Pseudo code for partition() /* This function takes last element as pivot, places the pivot element at its correct position in sorted array, and places all smaller (smaller than pivot) to left of pivot and all greater elements to right of pivot */ partition (arr[], low, high) { // pivot (Element to be placed at right position) pivot = arr[high]; i = (low - 1) // Index of smaller element for (j = low; j <= high- 1; j++) { // If current element is smaller than the pivot if (arr[j] < pivot) { i++; // increment index of smaller element swap arr[i] and arr[j] } } swap arr[i + 1] and arr[high])
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1/20/2020 QuickSort - GeeksforGeeks 4/18 return (i + 1) } Illustration of partition() : arr[] = {10, 80, 30, 90, 40, 50, 70} Indexes: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 low = 0, high = 6, pivot = arr[h] = 70 Initialize index of smaller element, i = -1 Traverse elements from j = low to high-1 j = 0 : Since arr[j] <= pivot, do i++ and swap(arr[i], arr[j]) i = 0 arr[] = { 10 , 80, 30, 90, 40, 50, 70} // No change as i and j // are same j = 1 : Since arr[j] > pivot, do nothing // No change in i and arr[] j = 2 : Since arr[j] <= pivot, do i++ and swap(arr[i], arr[j]) i = 1 arr[] = {10, 30 , 80 , 90, 40, 50, 70} // We swap 80 and 30 j = 3 : Since arr[j] > pivot, do nothing // No change in i and arr[] j = 4 : Since arr[j] <= pivot, do i++ and swap(arr[i], arr[j]) i = 2 arr[] = {10, 30, 40 , 90, 80 , 50, 70} // 80 and 40 Swapped j = 5
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