JwP_Project2.docx - Running head: IN-FLIGHT UNCONTAINED...

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Running head: IN-FLIGHT UNCONTAINED TURBINE ENGINE FAILURE1Project 2: In-flight uncontained turbine engine failure
IN-FLIGHT UNCONTAINED TURBINE ENGINE FAILURE2AbstractA scheduled passenger flight, Qantas Flight 32, departed from Changi Airport, Singapore toSidney, Australia (Australian Transport Safety Bureau [ATSB], 2013). Uncontained enginefailure occurred shortly after take-off when the pilots heard two bangs and followed by multiplewarnings indicated on the electronic centralized aircraft monitor (ECAM) (ATSB, 2013). Theaccident aircraft, an Airbus A380, was powered by Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines (ATSB,2013). The uncontained engine failure was caused by an internal oil fire that resulted in theruptured intermediate pressure turbine disc from its drive shaft (ATSB, 2013). The accidentinvestigation under the supervision of the ATSB shown that the fire broke out due to oil leakagefrom the crack in oil feed stub pipe (ATSB, 2013). The investigators discovered that the oil feedstub pipe cracked because of the misalignment in counterbore that was not manufactured incompliance with the design specification (ATSB, 2013). The ATSB has proposed safetyrecommendations and assessed several safety actions implemented by the involved organizationsto prevent the occurrence of similar accidents in the future.Keywords: Qantas flight 32, uncontained engine failure, crack, oil feed stub pipe,misalignment, design specifications
IN-FLIGHT UNCONTAINED TURBINE ENGINE FAILURE3IntroductionThe purpose of propulsion plant investigation is to assess the level of engine performanceduring the impact and to determine whether the engine was performing at the level selected bythe pilots (Anderson, 2009). The most crucial outcomes of an investigation are to determine theprobable cause of the accident and to provide recommended corrective actions so that futureoccurrences can be prevented. There are several types of turbine engines that were classifiedaccordingly to their type of compressors and how power was generated (Federal AviationAdministration [FAA], 2016). An investigator would need to be able to comprehend the workingknowledge of the turbine engine systems and operations to perform extensive analysis during theinvestigation process. Besides that, an investigator should also know about the design andconstruction of turbine engines to identify the damaged parts and components during an accidentinvestigation.Summary of AccidentThe accident flight, Qantas 32, was an Airbus A380 aircraft and registered as VH-OQA(ATSB, 2013). Qantas 32 was on a passenger flight which was scheduled to depart from ChangiAirport, Singapore and arrive in Sidney, Australia with 440 passengers, 24 flight attendants, and5 flight crew on board (ATSB, 2013). Approximately 4 minutes after take-off, while the aircraftwas still climbing, the flight crew heard two loud “bangs” followed by a series of warnings andcautions indicated on the electronic centralized aircraft monitor (ECAM). At first, the flight crew

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Term
Fall
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Tags
Turbofan, Gas compressor, Australian Transport Safety Bureau

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