HIS100JHORTONPP (2).pptx - The Apartheid of South Africa...

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Unformatted text preview: The Apartheid of South Africa HIS 100 SNHU Jessica Horton My Topic The topic I chose was the South African apartheid. The South African apartheid began in 1948 and lasted through 1994. The apartheid was created by the National Party to segregate races in order to try and help South Africa’s economy and culture. It was a brutal act of racism that ultimately led to the imprisonment of the natives including Nelson Mandela. The imprisonment of Mandela ultimately led to the freedom of the majority races and Mandela being elected president. My research question: What began the apartheid in South Africa and what ended it? My thesis statement: During World War II and the Great Depression, there were a lot of economical struggles in South Africa which resulted in the National Party to force segregation of the other races in South Africa, leading to the apartheid. Nelson Mandela and the other prisoners during the apartheid, produced new hopes and ideas to make South Africa whole again and bring peace back to their land; also ending the apartheid. Historical Lens and History’s Value Historical lenses are ways to analyze history in different perspectives. There are six different types of historical lenses. History’s value is a way for historians to measure the importance of a document or event. The historical value of the apartheid in South Africa during 1948-1994 is the on-going affects today. South Africa, in current time, has made a new constitution to base their views on human rights and freedom. South Africa is working hard and striving to end the economical struggles, poverty, and inequality in current times. Historic al Lens One The first historical lens I chose was the social lens. The social lens is based upon interactions due to ethnicity, class, and/or gender. The social lens applies to the apartheid by the separation of racial groups excluding the whites of the National Party. The people of South Africa were separated in three types of groups; which was the whites, the natives (blacks), and the Indians and other mixed races. This was established under the Population Historical Lens Two The second historical lens I chose was the economic lens. The economic lens focuses on the local, nationwide, and international economy and economical issues. During the apartheid, the economy was suffering because the National Party decided to shut down trades with most everyone outside of South Africa. The National Party restricted the flow of currency, which resulted in poor economical conditions. The National Party thus created a strong banking system, and better living conditions for the whites versus all the other races. These conditions included better education, health, water, and power for the white minority leaders and poorer living conditions for the natives and mixed races. Historical Lens Three The last historical lens I chose was the political lens. The political lens refers to legislation and how the laws made during that era affected the individuals of that country and locale. The political lens relates to my topic by the National Party, which was created by a bunch of Caucasian men, creating the apartheid and acts during the apartheid—relating to how it affected the individuals in South Africa, including Nelson Mandela. There were a large amount of acts and laws created during the apartheid, such as the Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act, Act No 55 of 1949, the Group Areas Act, Act No 41 of 1950, the Natives Laws Amendment Act of 1952, and the Bantu Homelands History’s Narrative The historical narrative I’m using for my topic is my primary source, Nelson Mandela and his firsthand experiences going through the apartheid. I will also be using secondary sources with their views on the apartheid events. The historical lens I have chosen have also influenced my historical narrative. Our Lives In history, we have seen plenty of racism. The apartheid in South Africa is just another example of a never-ending issue. The type of racism being experienced by the natives, Indians, and mixed races was brutal, unnecessary, forceful, and wrong in every aspect. Every race should be treated equally but, still in 2019, we are still struggling with different types of racism. Some examples of the racism occurring now is African American’s experiencing police brutality, different races not agreeing with President Trump because he is Caucasian, or just general hate racism. It is unfortunate and hopefully it will subside in the near future. Does History Repeat Itself? My Opinion. I do think history repeats itself. I think that history could also be changed if we looked at how it affected the world or community during the time frame it was occurring. I don’t think it is the same every time it happens; I feel as if it changes slightly but with the same core concepts. Does History Repeat Itself? Course Evidence. The apartheid in South Africa uses a theme of racism which is still a strong contemporary issue throughout the world today, especially here in the USA. You have police violence against races for one example. Another example is just general racism. A good example is most African American’s not liking President Trump because Barack Obama was African American and vice versa with Barack Obama with Caucasians. Citizen’s Obligation I think it important to know about the issues happening in the world around you, I don’t necessarily think it is an obligation. I think I can personally make a better impact on my community if I know about issues happening. I could help change social injustice, racism, and many other things with help of others in the community if we were to stay aware of history and historical events. Sources Yadav, A. K. (2007). Nelson Mandela and the Process of Reconciliation in South Africa. India Quarterly, 63(4), 49–84. Soudien, C. (2015). Nelson Mandela, Robben Island and the Imagination of a new South Africa. Journal of Southern African Studies, 41(2), 353– 366. DOI: 10.1080/03057070.2015.1012915 The O'Malley Archives. (n.d.). Retrieved December 6, 2019, from 8/04lv01600/05lv01617/06lv01623.htm . Mandela, N. (1990). Apartheid Has No Future. Vital Speeches of the Day, 56(10), 295–297. Retrieved from rue&db=khh&AN=9004020559&site=eds-live&scope=site Longley, R. (2018, May 3). Major Events Leading to the End of South African Racial Apartheid. Retrieved December 21, 2019, from ...
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