Robert Land PM 584 WK 4 Risk Management Planning California High-Speed Rail.docx

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Running head: RISK MANAGEMENT PLANNING CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL 1 Risk Management Planning California High-Speed Rail Robert Land PM/584 January 13, 2020 Deborah Reid
RISK MANAGEMENT PLANNING CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL 2 Risk Management Planning California High-Speed Rail Executive Summary The California bullet train plan was in high gear to start in 2008 and there were only ten employees that were the ones to manage and oversee the design of the largest construction project that the state has ever seen (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). The consultants stated that there was no need to hire hundreds or even thousands of in-house engineers and rail experts, because they felt that they could handle the work load themselves and help save California money (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). It was stated that it would take them only twelve years to bore under the mountains, bridge rivers and to build 520 miles of rail bed and it would only cost $33 billion (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). For several years the state officials followed that advice to develop one of the nation’s first high-speed rail line and that would be overseen by a minuscule government staff (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). Even a decade later the decision has been proven that this was a foundational error within the project’s execution (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). The miscalculation has now resulted in the California High-Speed Rail Authority being reliant on the network of high-cost consultants who has had a consistently underestimated the difficulty task (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). These consultants now manage every aspect of
RISK MANAGEMENT PLANNING CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL 3 the job. This ranges from the direct day-to-day construction to the negotiation with farmers to buy land (VARTABEDIAN, April 26, 2019). Project Summary For many years the idea of having a high-speed rail line connecting two of the most populous regions of the state (California High-Speed Rail Authority, May 2019). This would go through the Central Valley and was championed by political and civic leaders (California High-Speed Rail Authority, May 2019). The California High-Speed Rail has created tens of thousands of jobs, has supported many smalls businesses, contributed to $3 billion in wages and $7.6 billion in economic output and most of this was in the Central Valley (California High-Speed Rail Authority, May 2019). In 2018 the business plan identified three key objectives that guide Authority decisions, initiate high-speed rail service in

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