Persian Wars.docx - Tessema 1 Dawit Tessema Professor Michael Kozier His 101 Persian Wars The following research will feature different wars in Greece

Persian Wars.docx - Tessema 1 Dawit Tessema Professor...

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Tessema 1 Dawit Tessema Professor Michael Kozier His 101 April 26, 2018 Persian Wars The following research will feature different wars in Greece that occurred between 490 BCE and 479 BCE. It will use the histories of the Greek researcher Herodotus of Halicarnassus as the main source of events. The Battle of Marathon was a clash that occurred in 490 BCE between a Persian invasion force and the Athenians’ army. “The Battle was led by the Persian’s king then, Darius I the Great” (Doenges, 2). He crossed the Aegean Sea where the Greeks were troubling his people and successfully subdued the islands. The Persian navy proceeded to attack Eretria, which took place in 490 BC, one of the cities that had supported Greek rebels in the Asia Minor. Herodotus states that they fought for six days, “after which the city was betrayed and its citizens were taken as prisoners” (Herodotus, 34). The Athenians are said to have possessed better armor and spears compared to the Persians. After their first victory, the Athenians attacked the Persians from the rear. According to Herodotus (Herodotus, 1834), the Persians lost 6400 men compared to their adversaries who only lost 192 men. During the Greco-Persian Wars in 480-479 BCE, king Xerxes of Persia intended to triumph over all of Greece in the second Persian invasion of Greece. The king’s intention was to avenge his father, king Darius. “However, he could not carry out his wishes immediately since he had to suppress the revolt in Egypt first” (De Souza, 2). Two years later, the Persians fought against the Athenians and Spartans. Only a tenth of the Greek cities joined the Spartan-Athenian resistance. The others remained neutral or submitted to Persia. The battle began at Hellespont
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Tessema 2 where king Xerxes and his navy had to cross the straits between Europe and Asia. However, currents and winds swept his fleet downstream angering the king. The absurdity of his inflated
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  • Fall '12
  • windham
  • Battle of Thermopylae, Achaemenid Empire, Greco-Persian Wars, Histories, Battle of Plataea, Battle of Salamis, King Xerxes

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