2014_DBQ_-_Foreign_Policy.pdf - 2014 APu00ae UNITED STATES...

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2014 AP ® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS © 2014 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: . GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -2- UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A Reading period—15 minutes Suggested writing time—45 minutes Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-J and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. How and why did the goals of United States foreign policy change from the end of the First World War (1918) to the end of the Korean War (1953) ? Document A
2014 AP ® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS © 2014 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: . GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -3- Document B Source: Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr., speech to the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, August 12, 1919. Mr. President: I have never had but one allegiance—I cannot divide it now. I have loved but one flag and I cannot share that devotion and give affection to the mongrel banner invented for a league. Internationalism, illustrated by the Bolshevik . . . is to me repulsive. . . . The United States is the world’s best hope, but if you fetter her in the interests and quarrels of other nations, if you tangle her in the intrigues of Europe, you will destroy her power for good and endanger her very existence. . . . No doubt many excellent and patriotic people see a coming fulfillment of noble ideals in the words “league for peace.” We all respect and share these aspirations and desires, but some of us see no hope, but rather defeat, for them in this murky covenant. For we, too, have our ideals, even if we differ from those who have tried to establish a monopoly of idealism. Document C Source: The Washington Treaty, also known as the Five-Power Treaty, signed by the United States, Great Britain, Japan, France, and Italy, 1922. The Contracting Powers agree to limit their respective naval armament as provided in the present Treaty. . . . [T]he Contracting Powers shall abandon their respective capital ship building programs, and no new capital ships shall be constructed or acquired by any of the Contracting Powers except replacement tonnage. . . . The total capital ship replacement tonnage of each of the Contracting Powers shall not exceed in standard displacement, for the United States 525,000 tons . . . for the British Empire 525,000 tons . . . for France 175,000 tons . . . for Italy 175,000 tons . . . for Japan 315,000 tons.
2014 AP ® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS © 2014 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: .

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