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Phonic and Spelling RulesSources:Ingham, A. (1973).The Blended Sound-Sight Method of Instruction,Regina, SKand othersSpEd 625 Assessment for InstructionBrownbridge
WESTERN OREGON UNIVERSITYSpecial Educator ProgramPrepared by B. BrownbridgePhonic and Spelling RulesIn 1963 Clymer reported on his study of how frequently the application ofphonics or spelling rules would result in the true pronunciation of words. Asa result of his study, Clymer advised teachers that the application ofphonics or spelling rules must not be considered useful unless it results inthe accurate pronunciation or spelling of written words 75% of the time.Clymer, T. (1963). The utility of phonic generalizations in the primarygrades.The Reading Teacher,17, 252-258.Johnston, F.P. (2001). The utility of phonic generalizations: Let’s takeanother look at Clymer’s conclusions.The Reading Teacher,55(2),132-143.Caveat re: the use of Phonic/Spelling Rules:1.Children who struggle in reading also usually struggle to memorizephonic rules and often have difficulty in applying such rules to connectedprint.To help remedy this problem, two things must happen:Only the most important phonic rules should be taught in the leastcomplicated manner possible. For example, in teaching vowelsounds, it is distracting to talk about "short versus long" vowels.Instead, a child should be taught the short vowel sounds first. Thenwhen a child encounters a long vowel as in the wordfind, tell him,"That vowel says its own name."Phonics must be taught in a way that allows these children toimmediately practice phonic information in real stories. Every time achild is taught new phonic information, he should be given a shortreading selection that highlights the phonic rule. Completing a skillsheet is good, but even better is to help the child practice applyingthe phonic skill to connected print.2.Sometimes the rules don't work.There are many exceptions in English because of the vastness of thelanguage and the many languages from which it has borrowed. Therules do work, however, in the majority of words.
Phonic-Spelling Rules2Vowels and ConsonantsThevowelsarea, e, i, o, and uand sometimesyandw. Vowels alsoinclude the diphthongsoi, oy, ou, ow, au, aw, ooand many others.Theconsonantsare all the other letters which stop or limit the flow of airfrom the throat in speech. They are:b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, qu, r, s,t, v, w, x, y, z, ch, sh, th, ph, wh, ng,andgh.The Most Common Phonic and Spelling Rules1.When 2 consonants are joined together and form one new sound,they are called aconsonant digraph. They count as one sound andone letter and are never separated, e.g.,ch,sh,th,phandwh.2.Every syllable in every wordmusthave a vowel. English is a "vocal"language; every word must have a vowel.

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Term
Winter
Professor
Anju
Tags
Vowel

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