BRIEF for hearing #3 - Opponents.docx - The City of Guelph Should Not Ban the Use of Straws in Restaurants Hearing#3 Opponent Brief Jenna Filice Gurleen

BRIEF for hearing #3 - Opponents.docx - The City of Guelph...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 14 pages.

The City of Guelph Should Not Ban the Use of Straws in RestaurantsHearing #3, Opponent Brief Jenna FiliceGurleen KaurRenae LoewenYing Lin LiangMarcin BabolGordon SlaterWesley MurrayMatt TurkaljKoshin RagheFare 1040 Environmental Economics, Law and Policy Winter Semester, 2019Lab 0102Instructor: G. Fox University of Guelph Opening Statement
Over the past year, single use plastics, including straws, have gotten a bad wrap, especially on social media. Influencers use guilt tactics by using photos of garbage on beaches and on animals to support the use of reusable straws. We, the opponents, say that banning plastic straws in restaurants here in Guelph is not the answer to the fight against mass waste. Our evidence will show that straws are a necessity in the businesses of Guelph. Straws can assist people who have disabilities, without straws it would be a difficulty for them to drink at these establishments. Restaurants are private property and they should be able to enforce their own policies about straws. Although there is talk that banning straws would be a step forward to less waste, the banning of plastic straws will not have a significant effect on the amount of waste produced here in Guelph. The theory of the case is that a government trying to place a regulatory restriction on a business violates private property laws. It should be the property owner’s decision to make the change, for or against straws. Background InformationStraws have been on Earth for over 5000 years. Used by Ancient Sumerians, as metal straws to reach into large jars. South Americans were also using metal straws long before Europeans colonized the continent (Houck, 2018). In the 80s, America used ryegrass straws to drink cocktails. In 1888, Marvin Chester Stone introduced the plastic straw to the world (Houck, 2018). Disposable plastic straws were then improved in the 1930s, grew in popularity in the 1950s for their durability and for hospital patients (Houck, 2018). The anti-straw movement started 9 years ago, conducted by a 9 year old, Milo Cress, with a video called “Be Straw Free” (Chokshi, 2018). To gain more popularity, he teamed up with Eco-Cycle in 2012, a conservation non-profit organization, to elevate his message (Chokshi, 2018). But the straw statistic - 500 million straws - that was used is fabricated, since he could not find any data on straws in the US
(Connor, 2018). Cress said in an interview a few years later, “Why I use this statistic is because itillustrates that we use too many straws” (Connor, 2018). Due to this campaign, plastic straws have now become a taboo. In 2015, a video made by a marine biologist extracting a plastic straw from the nostril of a sea turtle went viral with 30.7 million views on Youtube (Houck, 2018), bringing the harsh reality of pollution to the public eye. Politically, it started with the California Governor Jerry Brown passing a law to reduce straw use. In the Golden State, sit down restaurants will not serve straws, unless customers ask for them (Brueck, 2018). Starbucks, a popular coffee shop, vowed to be rid of every plastic straw by 2020. Following in July 2018, bars

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture