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Running head: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time 1 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Holly Knott Rasmussen College Author Note This paper is being submitted on January 29, 2020 for Lisa Teitlers’ Class, Modern World Literature, 2019 Summer Quarter, T1.
Literary Analysis 2 Change is essential in character development because it shows how the character(s) progresses after numerous stages. In The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon, Christopher could be considered hero because he overpowers obstacles to attain his goals and grow as an individual. He is brave, antisocial, and strongminded; these are all character traits that take him on the hero’s voyage. These traits slowly help him to accomplish what he wants and show him that he can do anything. Christopher shows courageousness throughout his journey as he breaks out of his shell. One example this is by demonstrating bravery. When he finds Mrs. Shear’s dog, Wellington, dead on the grass, he does not respond in a juvenile way. When the police are investigating the scene, Christopher says, “The policeman squatted beside me and said, ‘would you like to tell me what’s going on here, young man?’ I sat up and said, ‘the dog is dead.’” (Haddon, 2003) In spite of the muddled situation, Christopher stays calm and collected. This proves that Christopher is relaxed around the police and gives straight forward answers to them. Besides, when Christopher discovers that his father is the one who killed Wellington, he makes to live with his mother in London, England. He takes the local train and demonstrates bravery because he is on his own and has not been alone in a busy place like a train station. When he is boarding the train, he states, “And then I went up to the door, and the doors slid open…and I was on the train to London.” (Haddon, 2003) Christopher is uninformed of the quick choice he is making, but his courage pulls him through to get to his destination. This represents that Christopher, the boy that always wants to sit in his room by himself, can be among others. When he reaches his goal, he recognizes his ability to be brave as he shows this through his journey. "I know I can do this
Literary Analysis 3 because I went to London on my own and I found my mother and I was brave…I can do anything.” Christopher said. (Haddon, 2003) When Christopher finally breaks out of his shell, he portrays the self-confidence, he has now, and his bravery can permit him to accomplish anything he wishes. This character development keeps the story moving, as Anne Perry states, “that characters need flaws that we the readers can relate too or sympathize for to get invested in the story.” (Perry, 2011) Having Christopher grow helps keep the reader participated in the character and adds a new set challenge later on. It is apparent that if this were the Christopher to be seen in his room alone, he would not be able to overcome the difficulties he was faced with.

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