POL202- Essay

POL202- Essay - Political Science 202 International...

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Political Science 202: International Relations Professor Gary Goertz International Relations between the United States, Cuba, and Trade Embargo Mason Upton 5/1/07
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The Cuban revolution of 1959 was a seismic historical event. It not only impacted the country of Cuba, but also the rest of the Americas, especially the United States. It helped reveal the limits of the U.S. Hegemony and reshaped the hemispheric relations. At first the United States poured in support to the nation of Cuba, and its sugar crops, helping establish a legitimate economy. This support in sugar created an economic boom, but it didn’t last long. The U.S. gained control of many sugar plantations and used up the fertile land for the valued sugar product (Winn 499). The people of Cuba became poor and it was difficult for them to feed themselves as land was unavailable. As a result of becoming poor, Cubans started to resent the United States and what they had brought onto their country. This large presence of the United States along with its economic dominance caused Cubans to look towards reform (Winn 501). They did not like the fact that the United States could consistently interfere in their political matters while taking away from their country. These factors led to the Cuban revolution and the rise of Fidel Castro. Once in power, Fidel Castro joined the ideals of the Soviets, and participated in the start of the Cold War (Winn 505). At the height of the cold war, and with strong communist movements in other Latin American countries, the unanticipated transformation of Cuba into a Communist outpost seemed a potential threat to the United States security. This threat caused President Kennedy to enact a trade embargo on the state of Cuba. The embargo was not only in an effort to stop the spread of communism but also to remove Fidel Castro from power. The embargo, along with attempted assassinations, sabotage of the Cuban economy, and guerilla infiltrations all failed and the Communist government still remained (Goodwin 17). Kennedy kept the embargo up until the day of his death. There the embargo has stayed even though its purpose has been exceeded (Goodwin). The original plan was to rid Latin America of communist threats. Soviet Communism has tumbled and communist movements in Latin America have
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disappeared. The United States has opened its trade markets to the Russia and Communist China, but still keeps the embargo on Cuba (Goodwin). From the individual level all the way to the world level, the embargo has its reasons for staying in place. The embargo is a perfect example of how domestic and international politics are linked together. Removing the embargo has large political implications for the domestic policies of the United States, while also having a great affect on international trade. At the same time keeping the embargo has changed the way possible presidential candidates deal with Cuba. Either way, the embargo has large political implications whether implemented or not. Realists, Liberals, and Social Constructivists have
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course POL 202 taught by Professor Goertz during the Spring '08 term at Arizona.

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POL202- Essay - Political Science 202 International...

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