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notes tuesday april 1 - -trying to create enough fear that...

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Tuesday, April 1, 2008 Rehabilitation - treatment; rose in late 19 th century and was the dominant justification for responding to crime throughout most of the 20 th century. Becoming somewhat bankrupt in the 1970’s-1980’s. ---Prevention not through fear but through transformation and change. Deal with the different causes, motivations. Assumes there are multiple causes, crime has different roots. Criminality may not always be a choice. Est. probation, control, sentencing policies, etc. Differences: Revenge and retribution are backward looking, moral or ethical punishment to crime. Revenge -emotional passionate act, lacked commensurability Retribution - trying to balance the pain and the injury to the action./Lesser the acts- lesser the punishment, more serious the act-more serious the punishment Deterrence - reflects ideas of Cesare Beccaria, Jeremy Bentham
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Unformatted text preview: -trying to create enough fear that someone will refrain from committing crime; Crime prevention through fear. Not so much severity of punishment, but certainty and swiftness. Incapacition- becomes preferred mode of rationalization. Takes off in 1980’s/ we see it reflected in changing sentencing structures, changing correctional system—warehousing Locking up persons and throwing away the key for long, extended periods of time All forward looking; functional, utilitarian 2 types of deterrence-specific deterrence- aimed at convicted offenders – does not work; we still use it general deterrence- aimed at potential offenders Do most people not commit crime b/c of fear of punishment? Research is legitimately debatable; does and doesn’t work for some people....
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