Lec4MoreProbHowCount

Lec4MoreProbHowCount - ORIE 270 Engineering Probability and...

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Review Properties of P Equal probabilities How to count. Title Page JJ II J I Page 1 of 34 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit ORIE 270 Engineering Probability and Statistics Lecture 4: More Probability; How to Count Sidney Resnick School of Operations Research and Information Engineering Rhodes Hall, Cornell University Ithaca NY 14853 USA http://legacy.orie.cornell.edu/ sid sir1@cornell.edu September 3, 2007
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Review Properties of P Equal probabilities How to count. Title Page JJ II J I Page 2 of 34 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit 1. Review 1.1. Definition A probability model has 3 components: 1. A sample space S –abstract set containing a subset which can be put in 1-1 correspondence with the outcomes of experiment we wish to model. 2. A distinguished collection of subsets A of S which we designate as events . When S is discrete, A is all subsets of S . 3. A probability measure P . This is a rule assigning numbers between 0 and 1 to events. Formally, P is a function with domain A and range [0 , 1] such that (a) P ( S ) = 1. (b) 0 P ( A ) 1 , for all events A ∈ A . (c) Additivity: If A 1 ,A 2 ,... are disjoint events then P ( A 1 A 2 A 3 ... ) = P ( A 1 ) + P ( A 2 ) + P ( A 3 ) + .... (1)
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Review Properties of P Equal probabilities How to count. Title Page JJ II J I Page 3 of 34 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Remember: A probabilist builds a probability model. A statistician confronts a range of models with the intent to pick the one(s) which best fit the data. How many hats will you wear? 1.2. Methods of constructing probability models. Two common ways: S is discrete: If S = { s 1 ,s 2 ,... } , we suppose we have numbers p k satisfying p k 0; X i =1 p k = 1 . Schematically S s 1 s 2 ... P p 1 p 2 ... We define P by P ( A ) = X i : s i A P ( { s i } ) = X i : s i A p i .
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Review Properties of P Equal probabilities How to count. Title Page JJ II J I Page 4 of 34 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit When S is continuous, say a subset of R : We suppose there is a density function f ( x ) satisfying f ( x ) 0 , Z -∞ f ( u ) du = 1 . We define P by P (( a,b ]) = Z b a f ( u ) du. Where does { p k } or f ( x ) come from? No magic: Most common reasons for specifying probabilities: Symmetry. Feeling that we want to model a situation where all outcomes are equally likely. 1. Example. Toss a red die and then a blue die. Then S = { ( i,j ) : 1 i 6; 1 j 6 } has 36 outcomes. Because we feel each outcome should be equally likely, we specify the p k ’s as 1/36 for each: S (1 , 1) (1 , 2) ... (6 , 6) P 1/36 1/36 ... 1/36
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Review Properties of P Equal probabilities How to count. Title Page JJ II J I Page 5 of 34 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit 2. Example. Pick a number at random from [0 , 1]. Then the set of outcomes is S = [0 , 1] . Symmetry implies
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Lec4MoreProbHowCount - ORIE 270 Engineering Probability and...

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