Anne Kalland in her essay Culture in Japanese Nature attempts to refute the assumption that the Ja

Anne Kalland in her essay Culture in Japanese Nature attempts to refute the assumption that the Ja

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Kenneth Sogi 10/11/2007 EALC380 For centuries, different cultures around the world have dealt with the delicate balance between nature and culture. Love and sensitivity toward nature is expressed in religion, literature, and art. For the Japanese, nature is the most important motif to their society and lifestyle. From block paintings of Mount Fuji to the haiku tradition, the Japanese seem to have little dichotomy between nature and culture. However, with Japan suffering some of the worst environmental disasters, especially during an era of modernization, some critics point out that there exists little relationship between the Japanese people’s “love” of nature and their environmental behavior. One of these critics, Anne Kalland, in her essay Culture in Japanese Nature attempts to refute the assumption that the Japanese people “love” nature. The Japanese preoccupation and focus on nature in literature, art, and in every day life, Kalland claims, is not a manifestation of an eco-friendly
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This essay was uploaded on 01/31/2008 for the course EALC 380 taught by Professor Bialock during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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Anne Kalland in her essay Culture in Japanese Nature attempts to refute the assumption that the Ja

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