syllabus 1407 spring 2009 non-learning community

Syllabus 1407 - Biology 1407.001 Introductory Biology II Spring 2009 Lectures BH 103 MWF 1:00 Labs CI 207 or CI 208 Lectures presented by Dr David

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Biology 1407.001, Introductory Biology II, Spring 2009 Lectures: BH 103 MWF 1:00 Labs: CI 207 or CI 208 Lectures presented by Dr. David J. Grisé Office ST 311, e-mail [email protected], phone 825 3477 class web site: Please see Web CT Office hours are posted on WebCT, other hours by appointment Course description : This course is an overview of the major concepts in biological diversity and plant and animal biology. Laboratory work will include individual/team activities as well as technology-related assignments. This course counts toward the natural science component of the University Core Curriculum. . Exemplary education objectives for core courses met by bio 1407 -To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences. -To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing. -To identify and recognize the differences among competing scientific theories. -To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies. -To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture. Learning outcomes for bio 1407 -To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry. -Be able to formulate testable hypotheses and predications from these hypotheses. -Have a functional knowledge of the theory of evolution and understand its importance as the unifying theme in biology. -Understand how the modern synthesis combines evolutionary theory with Mendelian genetics and advances in other fields - Have a working knowledge of the Hardy-Weinberg Law or Equilibrium. Understand that this is the basis of comparison and it is the as the expectation when no evolutionary forces at work in a population -Understand how evolutionary forces (gene flow, genetic drift, mutation) act in populations and how these forces can lead to speciation or prevent speciation. -Understand how the fundamental differences in animal and plant life cycles influence inheritance of mutations and speciation. -Understand how natural selection can lead to a loss of genetic diversity in populations or can lead to maintenance of genetic diversity in populations -Understand the mechanisms that can lead to speciation. -Have an understanding of phylogeny and systematics. -Understand a portion of the vast biological diversity on our planet -Have a working knowledge of ecological concepts in population and community ecology
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-Understand aspects of physiology including animal and plant body organization, transport in both groups and homeostasis. -Understand that this is an important part of the syllabus to read because it summarizes what you
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2009 for the course JUS 123 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College.

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Syllabus 1407 - Biology 1407.001 Introductory Biology II Spring 2009 Lectures BH 103 MWF 1:00 Labs CI 207 or CI 208 Lectures presented by Dr David

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