lab 3 - Paul Sanders Phys 141 Sect. 16 Forces and Vectors...

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Paul Sanders Phys 141 Sect. 16 Forces and Vectors Lab Goals: The goal of this experiment was to study about forces and vectors, specifically the addiction of vectors and of forces in equilibrium. Theory: The theory of this lab comes from the equation force is equal to mass times acceleration, where all three of these quantities are vectors (Qi). Since the acceleration is constant in this lab, we see the equation simply as force is equal to mass. Since the quantities are also vectors, their direction must also be taken into account. This corresponds to the angle of the vector, or theta. To calculate a force’s components, you multiply the mass by the cosine of theta for x and sine of theta for y. To add forces, you take the square root of the squares of the masses to find the overall force of the added masses, then take the inverse tangent of the y divided by the x. For forces that aren’t perpendicular, you must calculate their components and then repeat the above process. Procedure: This experiment consisted of several parts, with two main experimental systems, the spring frame and the force table. The first part of the lab involved the spring system adjusting the height of the mass in relation the pulley and observing how the mass pulled on the string at different heights. The first part was where the mass was above the pulley, then at the same level, then equal with the pulley. We hypothesized that the higher the weight in relationship to the pulley, the less force the pulley
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lab 3 - Paul Sanders Phys 141 Sect. 16 Forces and Vectors...

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