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Running head: AUTISM CASE STUDY AND DEVLOPMENT 1 Case Study on Autism in Early Childhood and Lifespan Development Ashley Santo Lifespan Development Early Development Case Intervention Analysis Capella University January 2019
AUTISM CASE STUDY AND DEVLOPMENT 2 Introduction This paper explains the signs of autism in a young child and how this developmental disability affects his lifespan development. Michael is a four-year-old boy born to Erika and Mike in January. He lives with his parents and seven-year-old sister, Brielle along with their great dane named Rylee in a busy town called Marlton. Michael is not attending daycare like his sister did and his parents work opposite shifts, so he often finds himself at his neighbors or grandparents house during the day and when Brielle gets home from school. Michael started talking around two years old but has since regressed and has limited langue at this time. Erika and Mike taught him some sign langue to help him get his basic needs and wants met and he can follow simple commands and use gestures if needed. Michael engages in repetitive motions and trys to put toys away that his sister is playing with instead of playing with her. Even with some of these issues Michael is a loving, always smiling and laughing, boy that plays well independently.
AUTISM CASE STUDY AND DEVLOPMENT 3 The Challenges Michael is having challenges with play skills since he only has exposure to his seven- year-old sister and two neighborhood friends whose parents will watch him at times until his father gets home. Michael was doing well and on target with his speech however there was a regression and although he still has some language his parents had to teach him some sign language to ensure he was getting his needs met. This has become a source of frustration for Michael since at one point he was saying two-word sentences like “bye mommy” and “go out”. Michael can only count to five and can only count out loud and no count objects. Michael should have a better grasp on the “one to one” counting principal however he has challenges with counting the objects. Michael also engages in repetitive motions such as hand flapping, rocking, and spinning items and these can get in the way of Michaels learning of new skills as he becomes fixated on completing the motions or spinning items. Lifespan and Cognitive Development and the Deficits Jean Piaget suggests that cognitive development is completed in different stages but Broderick and Blewitt (2015) explained that these stages may not flow from one area to the next in a structured format and could be scattered depending on the child (pg, 81). Michael is in the preoperational stage since this is between ages two and seven and Michael is four years old. In this stage, children are growing in areas of cognition including numbers, symbolism, creativity, pretend play, etc. In regard to numbers, young children Michael’s age are learning to count with the “one to one” principal which is counting one item one time. Michael cognitive development

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