commonlit_the-necklace_student (1).pdf - Name Toisha Love Class 2nd Period The Necklace By Guy de Maupassant 1884 Guy de Maupassant(1850-1893 was a

commonlit_the-necklace_student (1).pdf - Name Toisha Love...

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Name: Class: "Diamond Necklace" by Kevin Harber is licensed under CC BY-NC- ND 2.0. The Necklace By Guy de Maupassant 1884 Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893) was a French writer known for his skillful craft of the short story. Maupassant’s stories often reveal the truth about human nature through the events of everyday life. As you read, take notes about how the author characterizes Madame Loisel, and what motivates her behavior. She was one of those pretty and charming girls born, as though fate had blundered over her, into a family of artisans. She had no marriage portion, no expectations, no means of getting known, understood, loved, and wedded by a man of wealth and distinction; and she let herself be married off to a little clerk in the Ministry of Education. Her tastes were simple because she had never been able to afford any other, but she was as unhappy as though she had married beneath her; for women have no caste 1 or class, their beauty, grace, and charm serving them for birth or family, their natural delicacy, their instinctive elegance, their nimbleness of wit, are their only mark of rank, and put the slum girl on a level with the highest lady in the land. She suffered endlessly, feeling herself born for every delicacy and luxury. She suffered from the poorness of her house, from its mean walls, worn chairs, and ugly curtains. All these things, of which other women of her class would not even have been aware, tormented and insulted her. The sight of the little Breton girl who came to do the work in her little house aroused heart-broken regrets and hopeless dreams in her mind. She imagined silent antechambers, heavy with Oriental tapestries, lit by torches in lofty bronze sockets, with two tall footmen in knee-breeches sleeping in large arm-chairs, overcome by the heavy warmth of the stove. She imagined vast saloons hung with antique silks, exquisite pieces of furniture supporting priceless ornaments, and small, charming, perfumed rooms, created just for little parties of intimate friends, men who were famous and sought after, whose homage 2 roused every other woman's envious longings. When she sat down for dinner at the round table covered with a three-days-old cloth, opposite her husband, who took the cover off the soup-tureen, exclaiming delightedly: "Aha! Scotch broth! What could be better?" she imagined delicate meals, gleaming silver, tapestries peopling the walls with folk of a past age and strange birds in faery forests; she imagined delicate food served in marvellous dishes, murmured gallantries, listened to with an inscrutable 3 smile as one trifled with the rosy flesh of trout or wings of asparagus chicken. [1] 1. a social class 2. a special honor or respect that is shown publicly 3. Inscrutable (adjective): impossible to understand or interpret 1 Toisha Love 2nd Period
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She had no clothes, no jewels, nothing. And these were the only things she loved; she felt that she was made for them. She had longed so eagerly to charm, to be desired, to be wildly attractive and sought after.
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  • Fall '15
  • Terry Wong
  • The Necklace, Guy de Maupassant, Mathilde Loisel

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