HC.Wk4.09Bb - Paternalism Hippocratic Oath: Principle of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Paternalism Hippocratic Oath: Principle of Beneficence (PB) should govern physician-patient relationship. Physicians ought to exercise paternalistic care of patients Priestly model of the patient-physician relationship
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Paternalism I. Principle of Beneficence (PB): the physician should act to benefit the patient. American Medical Association (AMA) Fundamental Elements I. Principle of Autonomy (PA): the physician should treat the patient with respect and dignity. Why the shift from PB to PA (or to PB+PA)?
Background image of page 2
Paternalism Four Reasons : 1. Institutionalization of Medicine 2.Increased awareness of iatrogenic illness 3. conflicts of interests between physicians and patients 4. social and economic differences between physicians and patients. (Jehovah’s Witness) Consequently, paternalism has become a serious concern .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Paternalism and Autonomy Autonomy: “giving oneself the law Jude acts autonomously when he is the source of his own actions. Note that autonomy is not an all-or- nothing affair.
Background image of page 4
Examining Autonomy Three Elements of Autonomy i. Freedom of action Case of the mugger; case of the tough physician ii. Freedom of choice (or decision) -that is, having options that are not too narrow Example: Jude is given 2 options a. playing on the team, but taking steroids to enhance performance. b. not taking steroids, but not being on the team iii. Effective deliberation -ability to formulate goals, set priorities, engage in means-ends reasoning, take appropriate steps to realize ends, and modify ends in the light of experience and reflection.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Paternalism Definition: Paternalism is the usurpation of a person’s decision-making capacity (whether preventing her from acting on a decision, or interfering with the way she reaches her decision) justified by appeal to the interests or well-being of the person herself. Two points: aim of usurpation usurpation not necessarily unjustified
Background image of page 6
Different Kinds of Paternalism WEAK PATERNALISM : the usurpation of a non- autonomous person’s decision-making capacity. STRONG PATERNALISM : the usurpation of an autonomous person’s decision-making capacity. MODERATE PATERNALISM : the usurpation aims at preventing a harm to the person affected. EXTREME PATERNALISM : the usurpation aims at conferring a positive benefit on the person.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Cases of Paternalism 1. Jane and her gynecologist (Hormone Replacement Therapy) 2. Jude in Africa (white-tail spider bite/ amputation) 3. Charles the Alzheimer patient (Glaucoma) 4. Mira with Hepatitis C, some related depression and asthma
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 34

HC.Wk4.09Bb - Paternalism Hippocratic Oath: Principle of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online