Voices of civil rights- Children's rights

Voices of civil rights- Children's rights - Tess Levitan EN...

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Tess Levitan EN 274- 301: The Controversial issues of Children’s Rights Professor Levine March 22, 2009
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Of course there are many reasons for the AIDS epidemic in Africa; one could blame improper healthcare or unsanitary conditions. However, the impact of education or there-lack-of can be just as deadly as the disease itself. In some parts of Africa there remains a rumor that a man infected with AIDS can be cured by having unprotected sex with a virgin. Many children and even infants are coerced in to sex or raped because of this myth, and instead of saving anyone, the young child becomes infected with the deadly disease (Caroll 9). Furthermore, children are often taught not to have sex until marriage to protect themselves against AIDS, and in fact many do, however all too often their spouses have already had sex and this method proves inadequate as a way of preventing the spread of the disease. It is natural to want to protect children from deadly information but withholding vital information puts the child at risk; this raises the question of what children and minors have the right to know and what they have the right to be protected from. There are many controversial issues relating to children’s rights, including the general reach of children’s rights, abortion rights, students’ rights, and child labor laws and practices. Children’s rights remain at various stages in different countries; in every country children’s rights tend to evolve as the country develops. In America children’s rights really began after the industrialization period; a time when children worked dangerous factory jobs for long hours. During these beginning stages of any country, labor is vital and often comes at the expense of the entire nation, even children. There have been many smaller child protection laws however the first, almost universally accepted was the Convention on the Rights of a Child (CRC). CRC protects and insures children’s rights by giving children: the right to survival; the right to develop to the fullest; protection from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation; and the right to participate fully in family, cultural, and social life (Caroll 16). The CRC was
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developed over a ten year period by the United Nations, and completed in 1989 (Edmonds 9). If a country accepts the convention they are expected to keep their childcare and laws protecting minorities to the CRC standards. What makes the CRC unique is that it is so universal that it can protect children everywhere; from a poor child forced in to prostitution or child labor to a child in a rural area deserving of equal education and healthcare. The only two countries which belong to the UN that chose to not ratify the convention are the United States and Somalia. At first glance this may seem surprising; however upon further examination of all the rights granted in the CRC and present laws in the U.S. a conflict of rights arises.
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2009 for the course EN 274 taught by Professor Marionlevine during the Spring '09 term at Fashion Institute.

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Voices of civil rights- Children's rights - Tess Levitan EN...

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