Research Paper II - Balloga, 1 Abram Balloga LING 1109...

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Unformatted text preview: Balloga, 1 Abram Balloga LING 1109 Research Project II 4/22/2009 Business Card Murder of Chivalry Chivalry- ME < AF, OF equiv. to CHEVALIER + - Y 3 > Middle English chivalrie , from Old French chevalerie , from chevalier , knight ; see chevalier .] Word History : The Age of Chivalry was also the age of the horse. Bedecked in elaborate armor and other trappings, horses were certainly well dressed, although they might have wished for lighter loads. That the horse should be featured so prominently during the Age of Chivalry is etymologically appropriate, because chivalry goes back to the Latin word caballus, "horse, especially a riding horse or packhorse." Borrowed from French, as were so many other important words having to do with medieval English culture, the English word chivalry is first recorded in works composed around the beginning of the 14th century and is found in several senses, including "a body of armored mounted warriors serving a lord" and "knighthood as a ceremonially conferred rank in the social system." Our modern sense, "the medieval system of knighthood," could not exist until the passage of several centuries had allowed the perspective for such a conceptualization, with this sense being recorded first in 1765. 1292, from O.Fr. chevalerie "horsemanship," from chevaler "knight," from M.L. caballarius "horseman," from L. caballus (see cavalier ). From "mounted knight," meaning stretched 14c. to "courtly behavior." Love- O.E. lufu "love, affection, friendliness," from P.Gmc. *lubo (cf. O.Fris. liaf, Ger. lieb, Goth. liufs "dear, beloved;" not found elsewhere as a noun, except O.H.G. luba, Ger. Liebe ), from PIE *leubh- "to care, desire, love" (cf. L. lubet, later libet "pleases;" Skt. lubhyati "desires;" O.C.S. l'ubu "dear, beloved;" Lith. liaupse "song of praise"). Meaning "a beloved person" is from c.1225. The sense "no score" (in tennis, etc.) is 1742, from the notion of "playing for love," i.e. "for nothing" (1678). Love-letter is attested from c.1240; love-song from c.1310. To be in love with (someone) is from Balloga, 2 1508. Love life "one's collective amorous activities" is from 1919, originally a term in psychological jargon. Phrase make love is attested from 1580 in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c.1950. Love child "child born out of wedlock," first attested 1805, from earlier love brat (17c.). Lovesick is attested from 1530; lovelorn from 1634 (see lose ). Phrase for love or money "for anything" is attested from 1590. To "for anything" is attested from 1590....
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Research Paper II - Balloga, 1 Abram Balloga LING 1109...

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