F_00 - 1 ASTRONOMY 100 Dr Werner Däppen FINAL EXAM 2-4 pm...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 ASTRONOMY 100 Dr. Werner Däppen FINAL EXAM __________ 2-4 pm, 14 December 2000 Exam Number Name (Please Print) 1. What is the most abundant chemical element in the universe? a) nitrogen b) oxygenc) carbon d) helium e) hydrogen 2. What is the second most abundant chemical element in the universe? a) nitrogen b) oxygenc) carbon d) helium e) hydrogen 3. Astronomers were introducing the notion of an expanding Universe as a _________. a) pure speculation that has no observational consequence b) sole consequence of Einstein's theory of gravitation c) hypothesis that can explain Hubble's discovery of receding galaxies 4. The Sun's location in our galaxy was first measured (by Harlow Shapley in 1917) by a) measuring the locations of globular clusters b) counting the density of stars in different directions along the Milky Way c) measuring distances to star clusters and H II regions in the disk of the galaxy d) comparing our galaxy to the Andromeda galaxy 5. ______________ of our galaxy, one finds predominantly older, metal-poor stars. a) In the center b) In the disk and spiral arms c) In the globular clusters d) None of the above: older, metal poor stars are equally frequent everywhere in the galaxy 2 6. In our galaxy, the Sun is located a) in the halo, somewhat above and outside of the spiral arms b) in the disk of the galaxy, between and well away from the spiral arms c) in the disk of the galaxy, inside a spiral arm or segment of a spiral arm d) we cannot tell where we are located because our view is too severely blocked by interstellar dust 7. The possible presence of a very large amount of unseen (``dark'') matter in the halo of our galaxy is deduced from a) the unexpected absence of luminous matter (stars, etc.) beyond a certain distance b) the rotation curve of our galaxy, which shows orbital speeds in the outer parts of the galaxy to decrease in an unexpected `Keplerian' fashion c) the unexpected high amount of interstellar absorption in certain directions d) the rotation curve of our galaxy, which indicates higher than expected orbital speeds in the outer regions of the galaxy 8. The observation by Hubble which demonstrated for the first time that the Andromeda ``nebula'' was at a very large distance from the Sun, and outside our galaxy, was a) that stars with characteristics similar to those of our Sun appeared to be absent in this ``nebula'' b) that globular clusters appeared to be distributed in a halo around the ``nebula'', a sure sign of a separate galaxy c) that the ``nebula'' appeared to be rotating night by night around a center which was not the center of our galaxy d) that the apparent brightness of Cepheid variable stars in the ``nebula'' was very faint 9. The primary evidence for the expanding universe concept is a) the slow increase in the Earth-Moon separation with time b) the redshift of light from distant galaxies, which increases with distance of the galaxy from Earth c) the discovery of black holes in binary stars d) observation of supernova explosions e) the receding motion of the edge of the universe 3...
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This note was uploaded on 06/26/2009 for the course ASTR 100Lxg taught by Professor Dappen during the Fall '07 term at USC.

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F_00 - 1 ASTRONOMY 100 Dr Werner Däppen FINAL EXAM 2-4 pm...

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