Unit 4 - Unit 4 1. Why do doctors find it so hard to treat...

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Unit 4 1. Why do doctors find it so hard to treat older patients? In “Primary Care for Elderly People: Why do Doctors Find It So Hard?” the authors point out that geriatric patients often have multiple and compounding adverse medical events that are much more difficult to diagnose and treat that the single illness that most patients seeking medical attention are experiencing. Two physicians conducted in depth interviews with physicians aged from 32 to 70 years old. Interviews averaged around 50 minutes, ranging from 30 to 120 minutes. Participants appeared to respond in an equally open and forth coming way to both interviewers. They asked the physicians to describe how the doctor- patient relationship was different with older and younger patients. Most participants enjoyed their interactions with older patients and emphasized that advanced patient age alone was not problematic. However, related experiencing increased difficulty in caring for elderly patients, which fell into three major domains: (i) medical complexity and chronicity, especially patients’ vulnerability to adverse events; (ii) personal and interpersonal challenges, including time pressure, communication problems, and ethical
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This note was uploaded on 06/27/2009 for the course GERO 101 taught by Professor Yaghmaee during the Fall '08 term at San Diego State.

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Unit 4 - Unit 4 1. Why do doctors find it so hard to treat...

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