{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture13 - Tuesday May 13 Lab#3 Scores are posted Pick up...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Tuesday, May 13 Lab #3 Scores are posted Pick up Homework #3 (problems 1 – 6 only) Solutions are posted Due date is  Thursday (5/15)  before exam Lab #4 Due Friday Program #1 Grading is in progress Program #2 Will be posted soon Midterm #2 Thursday (5/15) in class
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Today's Topics More about the Internet Protocol (IP) Protocols, addressing, routing Fragmentation Midterm #2 Review
Background image of page 2
3 Address masks To identify destination network, apply  address mask  to  destination address  and compare to  network address  in  routing  table   Use Boolean  and   if ((Mask[i] & D) == Dest[i]) forward to NextHop[i]
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 IP address classes Class A, B and C are  primary classes   Used for ordinary host addressing  Class D is used for multicast, a limited form of broadcast  Internet hosts join a multicast group  Packets are delivered to all members of group  Routers manage delivery of single packet from source to all members of multicast  group  Used for multicast backbone  Class E is reserved 
Background image of page 4
5 What if the form doesn't fit? Large organizations may not be able to get as many addresses  in the Internet as they need  Example - UPS needs addresses for  millions  of computers  Example – School needs 6000 hosts Too big for class C, too many wasted addresses for class B
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6 Possible solutions Classless addressing  allow division between prefix and suffix at any bit boundary Sharing an IP address Use one IP address for multiple hosts
Background image of page 6
7 Classless Addressing Example 128.193.47.25 dotted decimal 80 C1 2F 19 hexadecimal 1000 0000 1100 0001 0010 1111 0001 1001  binary This can be “re-aligned” to use variable-size prefixes and suffixes. Example: Suppose we want a 22-bit prefix and a 10-bit suffix
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
8 Example: 1000 0000 1100 0001 0010 1111 0001 1001   Logical AND with a " mask " using 22 bits for prefix ( netmask ), 10  bits for suffix: 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1100 0000 0000 … gives a prefix: 1000 0000 1100 0001 0010 11 00 0000 0000 The complement mask ( hostmask ) 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0011 1111 1111 … gives a suffix: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000   00 11 0001 1001
Background image of page 8
9 Example: 1000  0000 1100  0001 0010 11 00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000   00 11  0001 1001 i.e., the “network number” is 80C12C00h, and the “host number”  within the network is 319h With 10 bits for suffix, 1024 host addresses are available within  the subnet (but 2 of these are reserved) Address still looks almost the same in dotted decimal 128.193.47.25  / 22 Additional information is provided so addressing can be handled by  routers
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
10 CIDR CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) address includes  specification for number of bits to use for the netmask Example: host address 128.193.47.25/22 What is the netmask?
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}