cs312-lecture6_slides

cs312-lecture6_slides - CS 312 Linux System Administration...

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CS 312 Linux System Administration 6: Processes Lance Albertson OSU Picture © Greg Keene used under CC SA 3.0 license
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Announcements HW2 Due next Tuesday at 2PM email tarball to [email protected] Midterm April 28 th Reading Chapter 4
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Today's Objectives Processes Signals Monitoring processes
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Components of a Process Address Space Current status (sleeping, stopped, runnable, etc) Priority Info about resources its used signal mask owner of the process
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Components of a Process PID: Process ID number PPID: Parent PID Niceness Control terminal
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Life Cycle of a Process fork Clone process init Always PID 1 All descents of init exit notify kernel its ready to die exit code ( zero is 'successful' ) Picture © Flickr user 'amorph'
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Signals Sent to procs as communication Sent to terminal driver to kill, interrupt, or suspend Sent by admin to kill Sent by kernel Picture © Flickr user 'atomicshark'
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Signals: Types you should know HUP, INT, QUIT, KILL, BUS, SIGV, TERM, STOP, TSTP, CONT, WINCH, USR1, USR2 See Table 4.1 on pg 49 Can catch, block, or dump core? WINCH – term emulators
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Signals: Differences in KILL, etc KILL – un-blockable and terminates at OS level INT – sent by term. via ctrl-C TERM – terminate completely, clean up state, exit HUP – two interpretations reset request for daemons (reload config) via terminal to clean up (kill) processes QUIT – like TERM but also core dump
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kill: send signals kill [-signal] pid Default is TERM kill -9 956 kill -HUP 456 pkill – send mass signal pgrep – return PID from a grep killall – kill process by name Picture © Flickr user 'dhammza'
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Process States runnable – process can be executed sleeping – process is waiting for some resource zombie – process is trying to die stopped – process is suspended
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This note was uploaded on 06/28/2009 for the course CS 312 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Oregon State.

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cs312-lecture6_slides - CS 312 Linux System Administration...

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