1st lecture The Maxwell equations

1st lecture The Maxwell equations - 1st lecture The Maxwell...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
st lecture The Maxwell equations There are four basic equations, called Maxwell equations, which form the axioms of electrodynamics. The so called local forms of these equations are the following: rot H = j + D / t (1) rot E = - B / t (2) div B = 0 (3) div D = ρ (4) Here rot (or curl in English literature) is the so called vortex density, H is vector of the magnetic field strength, j is the current density vector, D / t is the time derivative of the electric displacement vector D , E is the electric field strength, B / t is the time derivative of the magnetic induction vector B , div is the so called source density and ρ is the charge density. While the above local or differential forms are easy to remember and useful in applications, they are not so easy to understand as they use vector calculus to give spatial derivatives of vector fields like rot H or div D . The global or integral forms of the Maxwell equations are somewhat more complicated but at the same time they can be understood without knowing vector calculus. They are using path, surface, and volume integrals, however: G H dr = I + I DISP (1) G E dr = - ∂Φ B / t (2) A B dA = 0 (3) A D dA = V ρ dV (4) where I is the electric current I = A j dA , I DISP is the so called displacement I DISP
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/29/2009 for the course MSE 2001 taught by Professor Tannebaum during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Page1 / 4

1st lecture The Maxwell equations - 1st lecture The Maxwell...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online