MSE2001H_3_3

MSE2001H_3_3 - 1 X-ray Diffraction whatever atom 1. We...

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1 X-ray Diffraction whatever atom 1. We shoot x-ray s (with the same wavelength) a crystal consisting of atoms. 2. The x-rays hit the atoms in the crystal. 3. The x-rays are diffracted (or scattered) by the atoms. The scattered x-rays have the same wavelength with the incident x-rays. (elastic scattering) The direction of scattering? It would be various, but x-rays scattered by the atoms with the same spatial condition (direction) have the same direction. Anyway, only the x-rays with the constructive interference can be observed.
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2 Wave Interference Destructive interference Constructive interference Composite wave When the waves have the same phase. “in-phase” When the waves have different phases. “out-of-phase”
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3 θ θ AB + BC = 2d·sin θ n λ = 2d · sin θ Bragg’s Law For constructive interference , the path difference should be equal to an integer number of wavelengths. A Huge number of x-rays hit a huge number of planes with the same direction and then make
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MSE2001H_3_3 - 1 X-ray Diffraction whatever atom 1. We...

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