Mari Myths - sandals turned into the first squirrels. The...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
When doing research I found some pretty interesting African myths. The first one is called Ainu. They believed that in the beginning, the world had nothing but a quagmire. They thought nothing could live there, but in the six skies above and in the six worlds below dwelled Gods, demons, and animals. They believed that Kamui, the creator God, made this world into a big round ocean resting on the backbone of a big trout. That the fish sucked in the ocean and spit it out again to make the tides; when it had moved it caused earthquakes. The first people, the Ainu, had bodies of earth, hair of chickweed, and spines made from sticks of willow. That is why when we grow old, our backs become bent. When Aioina, the divine man, came back to heaven they smelt something funny. Finally they traced the smell to Aioina's clothes. The Gods sent him back to earth and refused to let him back into heaven until he left all his clothes on Earth. Aioina's cast-off
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: sandals turned into the first squirrels. The next African myth I found was called the Apache. They believed nothing existed; only darkness was everywhere. The creator woke up and made light and clouds. He created a little boy and a little girl and made a ball for them to kick around and had they wind blow into it to create the world with lots of water on the west side. Big Dipper can still be seen in the northern sky at night, a reliable guide to all. The last one I found is called Australian Aboriginal: The Dreamtime. They believed there were eternal ancestors beneath the earth. They would wander to the earth in different forms; animals, kangaroos, emus, lizards. The Ungambikula made heads, bodies, legs, and arms out of various things. They believe that every man and woman owe allegiance to the animal or plant that they were made out of....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online