adam bede ec

adam bede ec - as the fisherman's sight is keenest on the...

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“…as the fisherman's sight is keenest on the sea, so Adam's perceptions were more at home with trees than-with other objects. He kept them in his memory, as a painter does, with all the flecks and knots in their bark, all the curves and angles of their boughs; and had often calculated the height and contents of a trunk to a nicety, as he stood looking at it. No wonder that, notwithstanding his desire to get on, he could not help pausing to look at a curious large beech which he had seen standing before him at a turning in the road, and convince himself that it was not two trees welded together, but only one. For the rest of his life he remembered that moment when he was calmly examining the beech, as a man remembers his last glimpse of the home where his youth was passed, before the road turned, and he saw it no more.” (310) Taking a look at this passage, we can see that Elliot uses figurative language to portray Adam as a kind, appreciative figure who is about to be deceived. Let’s start—Elliot first compares
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2009 for the course ECE 495K taught by Professor Vijaykumar during the Spring '08 term at Purdue.

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adam bede ec - as the fisherman's sight is keenest on the...

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