Marine Ecology Notes - Marine Ecology Notes 2/5/08 17:01...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Marine Ecology Notes 17:01 2/5/08 Clark Hubbs 1921 – 2008 $0.05 per species $1.00 new species or subspecies $5.00 new genus The Nekton Where do they live? o Epipelagic zone Close to the surface; upper layer of the ocean Important because there is light. Vision; can see predators and prey Suspended in this medium; no where to hide Primary productivity – mostly in the coastal zone Lots and lots of copepods; consumers of phytoplankton Pelagic zone – not as much productivity; Organisms have  Who are they? o Holoepipelagic – always found in this zone
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
o Meroepipelagic – spend part of their lifecycle in the epipelagic zone o Over 30,000 different species of fish. o Avg. fish will be a Teleost (bony fish) o Nekton – (different than plankton) can swim against currents;  o Vertebrates –  Reptiles – sea snakes; turtles; marine iguanas; salt water crocodile Certain adaptations for breathing, either stay at the surface, or are  able to hold their breath for a long period of time Pretty much apex predators for millions of years. Came to land then went back to the ocean. There is more food in the ocean. The best swimmers are shaped like fish. Torpedo shape,  Birds – more coastal Mammals – whales and what not o Invertebrates –  Squid  8 sets of arms; two really long arms; suckers have teeth called  chitin. o Ichthyosaur – monster of the ancient sea; huge; looked like a dolphin;  large eyes and prob. acoustical adaptations o Lots of different body plans. o Avian –  Penguins – nekton, at least coastal nekton. Eats fish in the ocean. Albatross – spend a lot of time out at sea; 
Background image of page 2
o Mammals –  Whales –  Seals -  Sea lions -  What do they do? Staying afloat o Consequences of sinking – Go hungry; because most of the food is in the upper region Cold  Wont be able to see; Light is absorbed in upper region Pressure – not adapted to high pressures o Why do you have to stay afloat? o The specific gravity of the situation The ratio of mass to mass of water at 4 degree C Archimedes principal: A body immersed in water will be buoyed up by a  force equal to the weight of the water displaced by the body (F = pgV) Life in water = g(V)(p’-p) p’-p>0; you sink p’-p<0; you float p’-p=0; neutral most animals want to be in the neutral zone changes with depth
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Benthic animals don’t tend to worry to much about bouncy o Bouyancy Density of seawater (g/cm 3 ) 1.025 (tropics) 1.028 (cold seawater)
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/01/2009 for the course MNS 320 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 44

Marine Ecology Notes - Marine Ecology Notes 2/5/08 17:01...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online